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Author Topic: How are the Germans celebrating 100 years since the ending of World War 1?  (Read 624 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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I think the BBC's coverage and the special from the Albert Hall has been nothing short of magnificent. And the documentaries and the sentiments and stories from relatives of WW1 victims has been heart wrenching.

And then I suddenly thought, hang on, how are the Germans celebrating 100 years since the ending of World War 1?

I can imagine that they might not feel they have quite as much reason to celebrate as much as we the victors do.

So, question time. How are the Germans celebrating 100 years since the ending of World War 1? 
"I live in hope"

Offline P-Kasso2

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Good news, peoples!  At long last, after having lain unanswered on the books since Remembrance Day last year, I have finally stumbled upon the answer to this question while looking for something else entirely on Reuters' website.

So here is the answer Reuters give - although there is stacks more info and commentary on the Reuters site, so it is well worth a couple of minutes of your time browsing it. Do click on it. The Reuters' web site contains massive amounts of items of interest apart from the answer to this particular question. Their web site is to be found at...

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-germany-wwi-remembrance/as-others-mark-world-war-one-centenary-germans-prefer-to-forget-idUSBREA2I0FN20140319

Reuters say...

"The centenary of the outbreak of World War One has caught Germany off guard, while Britain, France, the United States and others mark it with battlefield tours, television programs, exhibitions and plans for ceremonies on the day, in August.

"Germans aren’t sure how, or even if, they should commemorate a war that cost them 13 percent of their territory, all their colonies, huge reparations and 2.5 million lives. The government is under fire for its inactivity.

 “Most Germans don’t want to have anything to do with the militaristic past,” said Stefan Scheybal, a mason who tends graves at the Invalids’ cemetery where Manfred von Richthofen was buried, a plot of land now bisected by a busy cycle path.

“We were brought up to scorn patriotism and everything about our belligerent history, so no one really feels a connection to World War One,” said Scheybal, 51.

“Most Germans don’t care who the Red Baron was. Only English people come to see his grave.”


The reasons for modern Germans' apathy run far deeper than the obvious fact that they lost the war and hate anything to do with spiked helmets - and Reuters' analysis of the situation is quite eye-opening for anyone even vaguely interested in present day Europe.
« Last Edit: 04 April, 2019, 03:38:26 PM by P-Kasso2 »
"I live in hope"