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Author Topic: Ransom strip liabilities  (Read 350 times)

Offline Duffield1

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Ransom strip liabilities
« on: 20 June, 2018, 07:48:20 PM »
We're moving house shortly, and the house that we are buying was at the edge of the developer's land - there used to be a 12ft strip of land running up the side of their house and halfway into the street that was retained by the developer, presumably because another developer owned the neighbouring plot and they wanted to charge them for access to their site.

Once the neighbouring development was complete, the owner of our new house bought the ransom strip and adjoined most of it to his own garden - but the deeds still show ownership of the pavement and part of the road.  There's a separate title number for this strip of land.

What liability would this give us for pavement repairs or similar?  We're thinking of putting in a dropped kerb and using the strip of land as additional parking.  Looking at the local authority website, you have to apply to them for planning permission to do this, and pay their contractor to do it, but how would that differ if we actually own the pavement?  As you walk down the street, you notice slightly different tarmac on this small stretch of pavement.

Any advice gratefully received.

Offline siasl

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Re: Ransom strip liabilities
« Reply #1 on: 20 June, 2018, 09:40:45 PM »
Is this a public highway? If so, it should have been adopted by the highways authority and so you would not be liable for maintenance. But it's very odd that you have title, as this would normally mean that the adoption process did not include that parcel of land.
It may be a simple case of gifting those bits to the highways agency.
Or setting up a toll booth :)
What does your solicitor say?

Offline Duffield1

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Re: Ransom strip liabilities
« Reply #2 on: 21 June, 2018, 04:03:16 PM »
Solicitor is waiting for searches to come back - the title plan is a bit peculiar.  I do like the idea of a pavement toll-booth, though...

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Ransom strip liabilities
« Reply #3 on: 05 July, 2018, 03:57:04 PM »
Solicitor is waiting for searches to come back - the title plan is a bit peculiar.  I do like the idea of a pavement toll-booth, though...

I know that solicitors are usually a blur of inaction.... but any news on the ransom strip yet?


PS The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors advises property owners to locate and price any ransom strip on a property, as the cost to release the "ransom" should be deducted from the overall purchase price of the property.

The agreement to access such ransom strips is lodged with the Land Registry.
« Last Edit: 05 July, 2018, 04:30:47 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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