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Author Topic: Has anyone ever discovered any fossilised parasites ?  (Read 182 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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Has anyone ever discovered any fossilised parasites ?
« on: 18 June, 2018, 02:07:38 PM »
Or are parasites maybe just not 'bony' enough to be fossilised?  Whatever. But I am still feeling optimistic that someone, somewhere might have discovered fossilized parasites. Have they? And what do they look like?
"I live in hope"

Offline jacquesdor

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Re: Has anyone ever discovered any fossilised parasites ?
« Reply #1 on: 22 June, 2018, 01:52:26 PM »
Wasn't a mosquito found inside some amber ? Preserved rather than fossilised, but since the amber is a fossil, I think the mossy was too ? Or am I working on the plot to a well known film? DNA and all that.

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Re: Has anyone ever discovered any fossilised parasites ?
« Reply #2 on: 22 June, 2018, 05:12:45 PM »
Nice answer Jacques but I don't think mozzies count as parasites. Bliddy nuisances, yes. But parasites, no.

I define a 'parasite' as... "An organism that lives on (or in) and feeds on an organism of a different species and causes harm and eventually death to its host." Such as lice, ticks, mites, flukes, tapeworms and other prehistoric nasties.

Mozzies just bite for a while and fly off, they don't live on and feed on an organism of another species until they kill it.

Have any prehistoric fossilised parasites ever been found?
Such as 30 metre long tapeworms inside Tyrannosaurus Rexes? Or dead fossilised giant lice the size of skateboards crawling in the fur on fossilised Woolly Mammoths?
"I live in hope"