!!

Guests can now post!

Welcome to Intelligent Answers.  As a guest, you are now able to post a question, subject to getting through our spam-bot filters.  However, if you want to answer any questions, you will need to register.  Thanks for visting!  (BTW - guests cannot post links, and if you post spam, we will block your IP and report you to every spam protection site we can find - we work hard to keep this site spam free for the benefit and enjoyment of our members!)

Author Topic: What's the difference between a 4-star hotel and a 5-star hotel?  (Read 666 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

  • Awaiting inspiration.
  • PK unique
  • University Councillor
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 53
  • -Receive: 164
  • Posts: 12255
  • Helpfulness: 214
  • January 2011 prize-quiz winner.

Apart from the price, that is.  I was wondering because I am just starting to choose a hotel in the west country for our next summer's holidays.

What confuses me and Mrs P-K is this...Are there definite guidelines that a 4-star hotel has to conform to before being given a 4-star ranking?

And - if so - just what extra facilities or services does a 5-star hotel have to provide on top (in order to move up from being a four star hotel to qualify as a five star hotel)?

Or is the difference in ratings just a subjective one? One that the hotel owner chooses or some  hotel guide book decides?
"I live in hope"

Offline Duffield1

  • Founder member and wannabe deity.
  • Administrator
  • Marie Curie
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 61
  • -Receive: 35
  • Posts: 2494
  • Helpfulness: 66
  • I ain't nothing but a hound dawg...
It seems that this varies from country to country, so here's a summary for the UK's ratings system, nicked from Group Leisure, and written by Gary Swarbrooke of Quality in Tourism, the assessment service for VisitEngland.

So what are the key differences between a four-star and five-star hotel?

Here’s a summary to aid group travel organisers in the hunt for their ideal accommodation:

A five-star hotel must be open seven days a week all year round.

A five-star hotel must provide enhanced services, e.g. valet parking, escort to bedrooms, proactive attentive table service in bars and lounges and at breakfast, ‘concierge’ service, 24-hour reception, 24-hour room service, and full afternoon tea. At a four-star this may well be offered but is not compulsory.

A five-star hotel must have at least one restaurant open to residents and non-residents for all meals seven days a week. A four-star hotel’s restaurant does not need to offer a full-on lunch service, however this may well be offered.

A five-star hotel must have 100 per cent of its rooms (as a minimum) with an en-suite bathroom with WC, and thermostatically controlled showers. Only 20 per cent of the rooms can have shower-only facilities if the size and quality of the en-suites is exceptional. A four-star hotel can have thermostatically controlled showers only.

A five-star hotel must have additional facilities, such as secondary dining, leisure, business centre, or spa.

A five-star hotel must offer permanent luxury suites, comprising three separate rooms - bedroom, lounge and bathroom. Four-star hotels may well offer suites but it is not compulsory.

A five-star hotel will have excellent staffing levels, with well-structured and dedicated teams with depth in management levels, as well as exceptional levels of proactive service and customer care. A five-star establishment is based on perfection, and extreme luxury and exceptional attention to detail.

With four-star hotels, the service should come to you, but with a five-star hotel your every need should be anticipated in advance of when you want them (e.g. staff of a five-star establishment will take control of luggage from guest’s arrival outside to prompt delivery in bedroom, full 24-hour room service and 24-hour reception and concierge services).

With a five-star hotel - even from the biggest chain to the smallest boutique venue - the customer is treated as an individual. The customer service experience is seamless.

In order to maintain this exceptional level of service, you would expect the ratio of staff to guests goes up exponentially for a five-star hotel. In a four-star establishment you would on average expect the ratio to be one member of staff to three guests. In a five-star it could be as high as up to two staff per guest.

In most five-star hotels you would normally expect a renowned chef who has achieved accolades ranging from Rosettes to Michelin stars.

There are many great iconic hotels in the UK, all offering exceptional levels of service at all star levels, but at a five-star hotel perfection should be guaranteed.

Source: https://www.groupleisureandtravel.com/Articles/whats-the-difference-between-a-four-and-five-star-hotel

Offline P-Kasso2

  • Awaiting inspiration.
  • PK unique
  • University Councillor
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 53
  • -Receive: 164
  • Posts: 12255
  • Helpfulness: 214
  • January 2011 prize-quiz winner.
 Gd_pst Gd_pst Gd_pst

Brilliant answer, Duff.
My question answered more thoroughly that I could have asked. I'd thought that the difference between a 4 Star and a 5 Star hotels was pretty marginal. I now know better. A lot better. Thanks again Duff.
"I live in hope"