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Author Topic: Shiver me timbers! Is this any kind of name to give to an Antarctic island?  (Read 1479 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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...or, more accurately, is this any kind of name to give to a piddly little rocky outcrop on an Antarctic island???

Cape Circumcision? Huh?

I was idly digging into the nitty about Norway's ownership of parts of Antarctica when I stumbled on Bouvet Island. Have you ever heard of it before? No, neither had I. Apparently it was once proudly British but , although uninhabited, it now flies the Norwegian flag.

And suddenly there it was! Right before my shocked and startled eyes - Cape Circonsision!

"Surely" I yelped when I'd recovered a bit. "Isn't Circonsision French for Circumcision?" I hastily ran it through Google Translate just to treble check and there it was. Circumcision.

So can anybody shed any light on the who, what, when and (most interestingly) the why on earth some demented sailor decided to call it Cape Circumcision?

Was it named after a very chilly event that happened on the island way back in time? Or something even freakier?

« Last Edit: 26 January, 2019, 01:15:15 PM by P-Kasso2 »
"I live in hope"

Offline P-Kasso2

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Oh fraptious joy! The mystery has been solved at last!!  After 3 years of lying ignored and unanswered, I accidentally found the answer to this question - on Wiki.

Wiki tells me that there is actually a very good reason why a cape on a poor little Antarctic island was lumbered with the godawful name of 'Cape Circumcision'.

First, you have to cast your mind back to 1739, because that's when it all started.

Back then, a little known but intrepid French explorer (called Jean-Baptiste Bouvet de Lozier) was the first man ever to clap eyes on Cape C, way back on 1st January 1739.

And, Wiki also tells me that, according to religious tradition, the First of January just happens to be The Feast of the Circumcision in Jewish tradition 8 days after the birth of the infant baby Jesus who, as we all know, was famously Jewish. Hence the cape's rather gruesome name.

Personally I still prefer the idea of the cape being named to commemorate the mass enforced circumcision of the expedition's long-suffering crew members in a sub-zero remote Antarctic snow drift would have made for a far more interesting and eye-watering reason for its naming.

But it's named after nothing more creative than the day when the Cape was first discovered. Now, isn't that a really gripping fact worth waiting more than 3 years to find out about? Nope. I thought not. OK. You can all go back to sleep now.
« Last Edit: 26 January, 2019, 01:22:31 PM by P-Kasso2 »
"I live in hope"