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Author Topic: Why does running when it's hot seem to make us more exhausted than running...  (Read 1836 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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...when it's cold?

I'd have thought that running in the heat would make us feel more fatigued but running when it's cold strikes me as far more tiring.

Is it just me getting things wrong? Or don't other people notice that running when it's cold is far more of a fag?

Why is that?

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Offline Hiheels

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Hold up, P-K, your Q contradicts itself...which are you going with being more tiring?

Offline P-Kasso2

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Hold up, P-K, your Q contradicts itself...which are you going with being more tiring?

I dunno. I think the heat of the last few days must be really getting to me! What I actually meant to say is Why is running when it's HOT more tiring than running when it's COLD?

What kicked this off was I remembered how I used to be able to ski for 40 to 50 km a day in arctic conditions without being cream crackered but even running for a bus is exhausting when its hot.

I was thinking that even keeping warm in winter takes energy and burns up calories...but in summer we have no need to work to stay warm. Despite this, running in summer seems to wear me out faster than a winter run.

Is there a physiological reason for this?
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Offline siasl

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I would guess it's at least partly due to it being harder for the body to shed heat in the hot, so we overheat more for the same effort compared to a run in the cold.

Nothing beats a run in a light misty drizzle.

Offline P-Kasso2

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I would guess it's at least partly due to it being harder for the body to shed heat in the hot, so we overheat more for the same effort compared to a run in the cold.

Nothing beats a run in a light misty drizzle.

I know you have experience of running the Great North Run and bow to your greater knowledge. In fact it immediately made me realise why the organisers of the London and Boston Marathon hold their exhausting runs sensibly in the much cooler month of April. And why the Great North run is clearly just as well planned being run in the light misty drizzle of mid-September's cooling air.

Of course, New York has to be different holding theirs in the soaring temperatures of the middle of scorching summer!

Would you say as a runner that this makes winning (or even completing) the New York run a far greater challenge than the London or Boston Marathons?

« Last Edit: 10 June, 2016, 10:34:58 AM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline siasl

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I would guess it's at least partly due to it being harder for the body to shed heat in the hot, so we overheat more for the same effort compared to a run in the cold.

Nothing beats a run in a light misty drizzle.

I know you have experience of running the Great North Run and bow to your greater knowledge. In fact it immediately made me realise why the organisers of the London and Boston Marathon hold their exhausting runs sensibly in the much cooler month of April. And why the Great North run is clearly just as well planned being run in the light misty drizzle of mid-September's cooling air.

Of course, New York has to be different holding theirs in the soaring temperatures of the middle of scorching summer!

Would you say as a runner that this makes winning (or even completing) the New York run a far greater challenge than the London or Boston Marathons?
I've done the NY Marathon twice - it's held on the first Sunday in November, if memory serves me correctly, so has a good chance of being quite nippy. Not sure when the Boston one is. Anyway - local weather will always play a part in the performance of a proper athlete (not me, I just trundle round the course). But it may well depend on the athlete, too. The Kenyans may well perform better in the heat as it is what they are used to training in. Also, local weather may well vary considerably at the time of year. I am fortunate to not have been in any long distance run in cold & miserable weather - I chum of mine did a half marathon near where I live in the middle of heavy storms. Saying that I have run in the GNR in 2006(?) when 4 people died - probably not helped by the scorching weather they had that day.

Lastly, the runs typically start reasonably early in the day - so the elite athletes who get round over twice as fast as me don't get much scope for variation in weather for the run.

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Thanks for the answer Siasl. You clearly have the inside track on running in different weather conditions. And you were dead right to pick me up on the date when the New York Marathon is run. I just checked, and it is sensibly run early in November. Don't know where I got the daft idea that it's run in scorching August.
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Offline siasl

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That's not to say that there aren't any runs in the middle of summer:
http://www.marathonrunnersdiary.com/races/uk-marathon-list.php
http://www.marathonrunnersdiary.com/races/international-marathons-list.php (strangely excluding US marathons)


Offline Hiheels

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...and not forgetting these idiots http://www.marathondessables.co.uk/

Offline siasl

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I prefer these ones: http://www.marathondumedoc.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=66&tmpl=index_en

I've always said that the only good marathon (like the only good county walk) is the one with a pub at the end of it. And that passes several pubs on the way.

I remember when I was about 16 at school we had to do 7 mile cross country runs every Wednesday across Epsom Downs in winter.

My classmate and friend Richard and I always came out of the school sports ground and promptly turned right while the rest of the field of 200 boys turned left. 300 yards down the lane on the right was a great little boozer with snooker table and roaring log fire and pork pies. Dick and I got really good at snooker.
"I live in hope"