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Author Topic: Are there still active volcanos under the Antarctic?  (Read 1309 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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I can't see why there should be active volcanoes in the Antarctic and equally I can't see why there shouldn't be either. But we never seem to hear a peep from them or any news reports about them suddenly blowing their tops.

So, are there any active volcanoes at the South Pole? When did one last erupt?
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Offline Cosmos

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Re: Are there still active volcanos under the Antarctic?
« Reply #1 on: 30 May, 2016, 10:01:00 PM »

I can't see why there should be active volcanoes in the Antarctic and equally I can't see why there shouldn't be either. But we never seem to hear a peep from them or any news reports about them suddenly blowing their tops.

So, are there any active volcanoes at the South Pole? When did one last erupt?

Yes, I remember reading about them a few years ago. They have been suggested as a reason for climate change as they affect the ocean.
Bare barbarer barberer rabarbera bra .

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Are there still active volcanos under the Antarctic?
« Reply #2 on: 31 May, 2016, 11:11:08 AM »

I can't see why there should be active volcanoes in the Antarctic and equally I can't see why there shouldn't be either. But we never seem to hear a peep from them or any news reports about them suddenly blowing their tops.

So, are there any active volcanoes at the South Pole? When did one last erupt?

Yes, I remember reading about them a few years ago. They have been suggested as a reason for climate change as they affect the ocean.

More details! More details!
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Offline siasl

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Re: Are there still active volcanos under the Antarctic?
« Reply #3 on: 31 May, 2016, 11:26:13 AM »
Wiki has a list of 37 Antarctic volcanoes, of which only 15 are known to have erupted in the last 12,000 or so years. Mt Erebus, on Ross Island, is the most recent, with continuous Strombolian eruptions for the last 40 years or so. It has a toasty lava lake on top that's visible from space (with a lens), too.

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Are there still active volcanos under the Antarctic?
« Reply #4 on: 31 May, 2016, 11:47:44 AM »
Wow Siasl!! Your answer just prodded me into googling the words Mt Erebus erupting and a really scary YouTube clip came up. It is well worth a view if you've got 8 minutes to kill. Good informative voice-over too from a German scientist in English. It's full of handy tips about what to do and what not to do next time you climb down into an active volcano.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6qOT0Xirvg

(You'll find several other, shorter clips on YouTube showing 17 second bursts if you really do have to do some work today.)

I didn't realise that Mt Erebus isn't like other volcanoes...
it goes so deep that the inner magma of the Earth is exposed! Apparently there are only two other volcanoes like this...one in the Congo and one in Ethiopia but because of political situations it's easier to get to the Antarctic!

Thanks again for the tip off.



« Last Edit: 31 May, 2016, 11:51:15 AM by P-Kasso2 »
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