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Author Topic: Is the force of gravity equal everywhere on Earth?  (Read 1257 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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Is the force of gravity equal everywhere on Earth?
« on: 29 March, 2016, 03:45:49 PM »

Is the force of gravity uniform all over the Earth? Are there places where gravity is stronger or weaker? Where are they? Does it cause any noticeable problems in those areas?
"I live in hope"

imfeduptoo

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Re: Is the force of gravity equal everywhere on Earth?
« Reply #1 on: 29 March, 2016, 05:31:25 PM »
No, gravity isn't uniform all over Earth.
It is weaker at higher altitudes than it is at sea level

It depends also on what material is beneath you - gravity is higher on land that is made of rock  than if you were on a boat at sea. ....the earth is not a uniform sphere so the gravitational field around it is not uniform. The force of gravity will also vary according to the mineral or oil deposits underground

There isn't a great difference but it is measurable. It's not, so far as I know great enough to cause a problem.

I read somewhere that at a certain height satellites height above the earth varies slightly depending upon what is beneath them but it doesn't seem to be a problem as it's a small variation - it goes slightly down then goes up again.

Gravity also decreases with altitude, since you’re further away from the Earth’s center. The decrease in force from climbing to the top of a mountain is pretty minimal (0.28% less gravity at the top of Mount Everest),

Some of the above came from a site that had something a bit distasteful in it so I haven't pasted the link.

There's a lovely map of the variations in gravity in the link below.

"The solid, rocky crust under the continents is almost 20 miles (32 kilometers) thick, while the crust beneath the ocean spans just 6 miles (10 km). Some regions contain lighter materials, some heavier. Actions within the mantle cause variations in density.
http://www.space.com/11849-earth-gravity-map-geoid.html

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Is the force of gravity equal everywhere on Earth?
« Reply #2 on: 29 March, 2016, 09:49:13 PM »

That map of the globe on your link is really exceptional, Mrs Too.
It's worth a couple of thousand words and it eloquently answered my question. I didn't realise though that the variation in gravity was so widespread yet, thankfully, only very minimal.

I liked the globe so much I'll add it as an attachment (unfortunately it won't let me copy it and embed it) so everyone can see it without over-exerting themselves unduly by clicking on your link.

For the energetic among you, here is Mrs Too's link again. The text is interesting too.

http://www.space.com/11849-earth-gravity-map-geoid.html


« Last Edit: 29 March, 2016, 09:51:01 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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