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Author Topic: What have we here?  (Read 2506 times)

Offline antonymous

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What have we here?
« on: 10 August, 2015, 11:23:54 PM »
see attachment;
« Last Edit: 11 August, 2015, 04:52:49 PM by antonymous »
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Offline antonymous

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Re: What have we here?
« Reply #1 on: 11 August, 2015, 08:51:46 AM »
CLUE;
They are not hieroglyphics.
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Offline siasl

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Re: What have we here?
« Reply #2 on: 11 August, 2015, 09:34:14 AM »
I'd hazard a guess at early arabic writing, but it appears to be going in the wrong direction.

Either that or a carrot, a worm and a slug...

Offline tecspec

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Re: What have we here?
« Reply #3 on: 11 August, 2015, 12:01:56 PM »
I remember seeing these 'symbols' years ago when I took a speedwriting (alternative to shorthand) course. The teacher used Hoyt script to illustrate how letters can be flattened and still be understood. That was part of what speedwriting was about, it wasn't symbols like Pitman Shorthand. You left out most vowels, used . for 'the' etc.

I admit I did have to look up the image to confirm the name of the script. I found more about it here:
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2012/03/weird-and-wonderful-yet-still-illegible/

;-)

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: What have we here?
« Reply #4 on: 11 August, 2015, 12:50:06 PM »
Just opened your link, Tec and you are spot on. But what the link doesn't say is what letters Ant's 'hieroglyphs' represent. They look all Greek to me. Can you enlighten us, Ant?
« Last Edit: 11 August, 2015, 12:52:05 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline antonymous

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Re: What have we here?
« Reply #5 on: 11 August, 2015, 04:53:23 PM »
The answer is on the page tecspec linked.  see att.

 

Stub pens, mentioned above - "in the 19th century, before the perfection of a new gadget called the typewriter (1873) people experimented with different nibs, including one called the stub-pen, whose effect was as blunt as it sounds. Simultaneously, a major change was underway in the production of typefaces. Having learned how to grow matrices from a cast character or piece of type (to pirate typefaces), the ingenious Americans soon discovered that instead of cutting steel punches, they could simply carve a character out of a piece of soft type-metal." http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2012/03/weird-and-wonderful-yet-still-illegible/
« Last Edit: 11 August, 2015, 04:55:35 PM by antonymous »
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Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: What have we here?
« Reply #6 on: 11 August, 2015, 06:22:40 PM »
I must clean my glasses more often! You are dead right, Ant...it was right there in Tec's answer but it was typeset in a point size commonly known as in mouse print.  And a very small mouse at that. Not surprisingly, I didn't even see it, let alone manage to read it.

Even up large your Hoyt characters are tough enough for me to 'read' what the characters represent even when it' s explained to me!

I have in my font collection a typeface called Hoyt Script
and as you'll see at the link below, it only has a passing stylistic similarity to your Hoyt 'hieroglyphs'.

Have you a whole page sample of your Hoyt characters en masse? As an typographer I'd be delighted to see it.

Here's what I know as Hoyt Script....

https://www.flickr.com/photos/51266334@N08/sets/72157638659292343/

What happened to Hoyt characters? Were they killed off by Pitman's shorthand?
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Offline antonymous

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Re: What have we here?
« Reply #7 on: 11 August, 2015, 08:01:41 PM »
I must clean my glasses more often! You are dead right, Ant...it was right there in Tec's answer but it was typeset in a point size commonly known as in mouse print.  And a very small mouse at that. Not surprisingly, I didn't even see it, let alone manage to read it.

Even up large your Hoyt characters are tough enough for me to 'read' what the characters represent even when it' s explained to me!

I have in my font collection a typeface called Hoyt Script
and as you'll see at the link below, it only has a passing stylistic similarity to your Hoyt 'hieroglyphs'.

Have you a whole page sample of your Hoyt characters en masse? As an typographer I'd be delighted to see it.

Here's what I know as Hoyt Script....

https://www.flickr.com/photos/51266334@N08/sets/72157638659292343/

What happened to Hoyt characters? Were they killed off by Pitman's shorthand?

They are one and the same scripts - the three characters e, n,  and r  [lower case] in your flickr picture are the same as those in my post. There is also a  copy of the document I posted  present. Marvellous site Flickr , havent seen any of your pics posted yet Facepalm

attached is a flickr image from the same area you linked .
« Last Edit: 11 August, 2015, 08:25:07 PM by antonymous »
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Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: What have we here?
« Reply #8 on: 11 August, 2015, 10:21:19 PM »

They are one and the same scripts - the three characters e, n,  and r  [lower case] in your flickr picture are the same as those in my post. There is also a  copy of the document I posted  present. Marvellous site Flickr , havent seen any of your pics posted yet Facepalm

attached is a flickr image from the same area you linked .

Just as I expected...Hoyt, particularly when typeset in volume, is a painful mess to read. It is, to my mind, among the very worst kinds of ham-fisted post-Art Nouveau / transitional Arts and Crafts mish mashes. Worse than ugly, it is virtually unreadable.

For reading, I far prefer Bembo...for its sheer ease, for its comfort of reading, for its stylistic beauty and for its classic timelessness.

And Bembo was designed 500 years ago. And there are good reasons why it has survived so long and is in daily use worldwide while Hoyt has bitten the dust.

Bembo sets half a millennium years of standards that Hoyt seems to have wilfully ignored. Namely, that type is not just meant to embellish, it exists to be read and to make reading the content a pleasure, not an endurance test,

Try reading a whole novel typeset in Hoyt and you'll soon see how far short Hoyt falls. You won't get past page two before chronic eye fatigue sets in with a vengeance. I cannot understand why anyone ever bothered to design such a criminally dad font.

Compare it Bembo....

   
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