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Author Topic: I have been reading a Ruth Rendell book and in it she mentions...  (Read 2363 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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A Wayfarer's Tree. What's a 'Wayfarer's Tree'?

Ruth Rendell was writing about a crime scene in this book I'm reading called End in Tears. The book is set in the north or the midlands or somewhere during a prolonged heatwave and the trees were wilting as if Autumn had come early.

The only description she gives of the 'Wayfarer 's Tree' doesn't really help. She only describes the trees at the crime scene as already all wilting in the prolonged heat. She writes...

"The Wayfarer's Tree which grew here in great profusion had turned from green to gold, from gold to red and were now almost black".

That I am afraid, as far as any clues goes, is it . Worse still, I haven't been able to find out anything Net-wise to tell me what a 'Wayfarer's Tree 'is.

Is 'Wayfarer's Tree' local dialect? Has anybody got an idea what a 'Wayfarer's Tree' is more commonly known as here down South? A picture would be nice too.

Possible visual clue? This is the cover of the book and it has a tree of some kind on it. I don't know if that is any help in identifying what a 'Wayfarer's Tree' is. Probably not?





« Last Edit: 30 July, 2015, 09:30:18 AM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline antonymous

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The Wayfarer (Viburnum Iantana) is a deciduous shrub with soft mid-green downy leaves. The flat heads of creamy white flowers of the Wayfarer are borne in early summer on its arching stems.

http://www.millfarmtrees.co.uk/millfarmtrees/product/wayfarer/
« Last Edit: 30 July, 2015, 03:01:47 PM by antonymous »
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Offline Hiheels

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Don't forget to quote your sources please, Ant http://www.millfarmtrees.co.uk/millfarmtrees/product/wayfarer/
Thankee  :D

Offline P-Kasso2

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The Wayfarer (Viburnum Iantana) is a deciduous shrub with soft mid-green downy leaves. The flat heads of creamy white flowers of the Wayfarer are borne in early summer on its arching stems.


Thank you Ant. So easy was it?
So why didn't that bliddy Ruth Rendell say it was just a bliddy Viburnum? Easy peasy.

And she even got its name wrong!

I checked with the website for the Royal Horticultural Society (who know more than most people about what's what if it is green and has leaves). According to them its real common name isn't the Wayfarer's Tree but the Wayfaring Tree.

No wonder I couldn't get any joy googling 'Wayfarer's Tree'!

Bliddy crime writers! Ruth Ellis should have her poetic licence revoked. Immediately!

https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/18912/Common-wayfaring-tree/Details

PS I see that Heels suspects you of using 'sources' for your answers. I say never! Your answers all come from your vast knowledge and unlimited personal experience of any subject anyone can mention. Doesn't it? Don't disillusion me now!  whisl

« Last Edit: 30 July, 2015, 02:45:17 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline Hiheels

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Behave, P-K  8)

Offline antonymous

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The Wayfarer (Viburnum Iantana) is a deciduous shrub with soft mid-green downy leaves. The flat heads of creamy white flowers of the Wayfarer are borne in early summer on its arching stems.


Thank you Ant. So easy was it?
So why didn't that bliddy Ruth Rendell say it was just a bliddy Viburnum? Easy peasy.

And she even got its name wrong!

I checked with the website for the Royal Horticultural Society (who know more than most people about what's what if it is green and has leaves). According to them its real common name isn't the Wayfarer's Tree but the Wayfaring Tree.

No wonder I couldn't get any joy googling 'Wayfarer's Tree'!

Bliddy crime writers! Ruth Ellis should have her poetic licence revoked. Immediately!

https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/18912/Common-wayfaring-tree/Details

PS I see that Heels suspects you of using 'sources' for your answers. I say never! Your answers all come from your vast knowledge and unlimited personal experience of any subject anyone can mention. Doesn't it? Don't disillusion me now!  whisl

Like all popular names for plants they are subject to regional variations that is why you should always quote the botanical name if you dont wish to be mislead as to which particular species you are referring to. For instance my source quotes it as the wayfarer plant -defying that supreme authority -  the RHS,

However - Ruth Rendall probably wouldnt have got her book published had it been titled "Viburnum Lantana".

You ask the questions P-K and if they inspire my curiosity I'll delve wherever to confirm my vast knowledge of the universe gleaned from 8 volumes of the "Childrens Book of Knowledge" read from cover to cover between 1950 and 1956 (I then discovered girls ;))
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Offline P-Kasso2

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PS I see that Heels suspects you of using 'sources' for your answers. I say never! Your answers all come from your vast knowledge and unlimited personal experience of any subject anyone can mention. Doesn't it? Don't disillusion me now!  whisl


You ask the questions P-K and if they inspire my curiosity I'll delve wherever to confirm my vast knowledge of the universe gleaned from 8 volumes of the "Childrens' Book of Knowledge" read from cover to cover between 1950 and 1956
(I then discovered girls ;))

Were those the ones edited by Arthur Mee? Bound in blue? Or maybe that was the Childrens' Encyclopaedia? Mine had 10 thick volumes and, like you, I was velcro'ed to them in the early 50s and 60s.

Either way, great books and great keys to opening the flood gates to a lifetime of the love of learning, unbridled curiosity and downright nosiness. All kids should get a set free and supplied at birth by a grateful nation.

But maybe Google and social media has taken over from a shelf full of books in every home?
« Last Edit: 30 July, 2015, 03:27:40 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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