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Author Topic: When was Mount Everest first discovered by the West?  (Read 1624 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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When was Mount Everest first discovered by the West?
« on: 30 April, 2015, 06:33:36 PM »
And what was regarded as the world's tallest mountain up til then?
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Re: When was Mount Everest first discovered by the West?
« Reply #1 on: 02 September, 2015, 02:22:13 PM »
I just wondered if anyone felt ready enough yet to have a crack at this question... it has lain undetected in an unmarked grave on the lower slopes of IA's old question archive for over 120 day now...

When was Mount Everest first discovered by the West?  And what was regarded as the world's tallest mountain up til then?


« Last Edit: 02 September, 2015, 02:28:09 PM by P-Kasso2 »
"I live in hope"

imfeduptoo

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Re: When was Mount Everest first discovered by the West?
« Reply #2 on: 02 September, 2015, 03:32:12 PM »


"Andrew Waugh, the British Surveyor General of India made several observations from the Sawajpore station located in the eastern end of the Himalayas. Kangchenjunga was then considered the highest peak in the world, and with interest he noted a peak beyond it, about 230 km (140 mi) away."

This turned out to be the mountain later named Everest.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Everest#Discovery


The first person to discover that Everest is the highest mountain in the world  was not from the West but, as India was under British rule at the time and Sir George Everest was in charge of the investigation to measure it was British, I suppose he qualifies.

"In 2852 after four long and arduous years of unscrambling mathematical data, Radhanath Sickdhar had managed to find out the height of Peak XV, an icy peak in the Himalayas.
The mountain - later christened Mount Everest after Sir George Everest, the surveyor general of India - stood at 29,002 feet (8,840 metres). "
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/3193576.stm

 It is not the furthest summit from the centre of the Earth. That honour goes to Mount Chimborazo

" Mount Chimborazo, in the Andes, is a 20,000-plus-foot peak sitting on top of a bulge on the Earth. Mount Everest is a 29,000-plus-foot peak sitting lower down on that same bulge. Because Chimborazo is a bump on a bigger part of the bulge, it is 1.5 miles higher than Everest!"
http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2011/07/ecuadors-mount-chimborazo-the-highest-point-on-the-planet-.html

I continue to be amazed at the number of questions that I've never seen!