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Author Topic: How come CVs are still known by a Latin name? Were they used in Roman times?  (Read 3967 times)

Offline Hiheels

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If you wanted to be a gladiator, did you send your CV to the head honcho...
"3 years at sword-weilding school, passed with an A grade. Hobbies are wearing leather skirts, wrestling lions, doing crosswords and reading".

Offline antonymous

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Latin was the lingua franca of the western world for 1000 years and it's knowledge is still used as  signifying  one's intellectual stature.
Estne volumen in toga, an solum tibi libet me videre?
(Is that a scroll in your toga, or are you just happy to see me? )

Die dulci fruere.
(Have a nice day. )

Sola lingua bona est lingua mortua.
(The only good language is a dead language.)

Source:http://www.alphadictionary.com/fun/latin_phrases.html
« Last Edit: 05 May, 2009, 10:24:29 AM by antonymous »
“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. Sometimes it'svice versa"

Offline Hiheels

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Romanis aeunt domus!

Hehehe, I'll definitely be trying to remember that first one  ;D

Offline antonymous

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Romanis aeunt domus!

Hehehe, I'll definitely be trying to remember that first one  ;D

Credo nos in fluctu eodem esse!
“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. Sometimes it'svice versa"

Offline Hiheels

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Offline Blacksmith81

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They're also called Resumés, in some parts of the world.

Offline Arellia

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They're also called Resumés, in some parts of the world.

Apparently in places (like over here) where both words- "CV" and "resume" -are used, there is supposed to be some difference between the two in terms of the content and length - but I haven't quite figured out the difference.
Most job information sites tell you that a CV is more detailed and longer; but then it gets confusing when an employer asks for a 1 page CV :|
« Last Edit: 06 May, 2009, 09:16:20 AM by Arellia »

Offline siasl

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No idea the difference between a CV and a resume, I've only heard of a resume in a US context, so always thought of it as the americanised version of a CV.

In terms of length - if there are lots of applicants for the job, keep the CV short and punchy. If there are few applicants, then you can afford to be a bit more wordy.

About 8 years ago I was filtering graduate applications and the basic first step in the filter was "what grade did they get in their degree" - there were so many applicants that pretty much everyone with a Tutu or lower was binned straight off - no attempt to read the CV itself. The next level of filtering was "how much garbage do we have to wade through to know what this person can do" - if I see nothing relevant quickly, it gets binned. Yes, this probably misses some hidden gems - but it's a darn sight easier than interviewing everyone who applies.

Ideally, any decent full-time job you apply for should have its own individual CV that highlights your skills in the light of those (you think are) required for that job. That increases your chances dramatically over a templated CV you send to hundreds of jobs.

Offline KentPDG

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CV is used mainly by academics.  It is a form of pretension, to indicate that they are erudite and conversant in Latin.  Knowlege of Latin was once a necessity for intellectual types, because in Europe at least all the great literature existed in Latin.

These days, there are some benefits to knowing Latin, but it certainly does not distinguish one's intellectual pre-eminence.  It is just a pomposity that lingers in the academic world.  Of course, some non-academics are influenced by professors, and adopt the same pretension, thinking that it makes them look special to present a prospective employer with their Cirriculum Vitae.

No down-to-earth businessperson, nor any other person of authority in any field other than academics pays any attention to the term CV.  Everyone uses resume, and lets it go at that.  Many managers and executives are quite put off at would-be job candidates who head up their listings of qualifications and experience with Cirriculum Vitae.  Many will reject such offerings instantly, tossing them into the wastebasked without reading past that pompous and foolish heading.

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that such a label makes you appear smarter or better qualified or more desirable as an employee.  No one believes that.  Some will regard it only as an immature affectation; but others will feel it identifies the writer merely as a fool.

Offline Arellia

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About 8 years ago I was filtering graduate applications and the basic first step in the filter was "what grade did they get in their degree" - there were so many applicants that pretty much everyone with a Tutu or lower was binned straight off - no attempt to read the CV itself. The next level of filtering was "how much garbage do we have to wade through to know what this person can do" - if I see nothing relevant quickly, it gets binned. Yes, this probably misses some hidden gems - but it's a darn sight easier than interviewing everyone who applies.
Ideally, any decent full-time job you apply for should have its own individual CV that highlights your skills in the light of those (you think are) required for that job. That increases your chances dramatically over a templated CV you send to hundreds of jobs.
This filtering process is what scares a lot of fresh graduates I think - but as you say it highlights why a short punchy CV is important. Do employers pay attention to the cover letter or do they go straight to that first cut criteria?


CV is used mainly by academics.  It is a form of pretension, to indicate that they are erudite and conversant in Latin.  Knowlege of Latin was once a necessity for intellectual types, because in Europe at least all the great literature existed in Latin.

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that such a label makes you appear smarter or better qualified or more desirable as an employee.  No one believes that.  Some will regard it only as an immature affectation; but others will feel it identifies the writer merely as a fool.

Hmm I would disagree with this as I think the terminology entirely depends on where you are. As I mentioned, over here different employers request for the CV using either term. From the answers here I infer that "resume" is predominantly used in the US and "CV" in UK. In my home country which is more predominantly british influenced, we use CV. Over here its a mix of both I guess because the education is still generally british influenced while having a lot of US companies. I do agree that CV tends to be the preferred term when applying for academic/research or scientific industry related jobs and resume used more in the business industry. However it seems unlikely that people here actually view the usage of CV as an affectation as I don't think both employers and job seekers are aware of this.
« Last Edit: 07 May, 2009, 04:58:05 AM by Arellia »

Offline Hiheels

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Indeed, Arellia, using the term resume over here in the UK would be far more likely to be perceived as rather affected.
CV is used across the board.

Offline siasl

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This filtering process is what scares a lot of fresh graduates I think - but as you say it highlights why a short punchy CV is important. Do employers pay attention to the cover letter or do they go straight to that first cut criteria?

At the time there may have been a passing nod to the covering letter - as long as it covers stuff relevant to the job. The stuff I was looking at was usually a pile of CVs picked up at graduate recruitment fairs, though, so didn't really have a covering letter most times.

CV is used mainly by academics.  It is a form of pretension, to indicate that they are erudite and conversant in Latin.  Knowlege of Latin was once a necessity for intellectual types, because in Europe at least all the great literature existed in Latin.

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that such a label makes you appear smarter or better qualified or more desirable as an employee.  No one believes that.  Some will regard it only as an immature affectation; but others will feel it identifies the writer merely as a fool.

Have to say I disagree with that, too - CV is certainly a very widely used term in the UK. If anything, the term "resume" is being filtered in from a US influence, where it is a much more common term.

Certainly in a US context I can see that your distinction may be valid - here I would think that if there is a distinction it would be the reverse. Personally, if I hear the term "resume" in conversation I am likely to think that the person is of North American origin than British - or watches too much US TV  :D

Offline antonymous

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Quote
Of course, some non-academics are influenced by professors, and adopt the same pretension, thinking that it makes them look special to present a prospective employer with their Cirriculum Vitae.

No down-to-earth businessperson, nor any other person of authority in any field other than academics pays any attention to the term CV.  Everyone uses resume, and lets it go at that.  Many managers and executives are quite put off at would-be job candidates who head up their listings of qualifications and experience with Cirriculum Vitae.

Tut! tut! Kent, your lack of Latin shows up twice in your misspelling of Curriculum!
Although I found it extremely boring and tedious learning Latin at school it has proven a boon in many different ways during my passage through life in matters of botany, pub quizzes, scrabble etc!
That the USA should adopt the french expression resume without the acute accent over the second e shows an appalling lack of respect for other peoples' languages - just as one would expect from a young upstart former colonial people!!
“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. Sometimes it'svice versa"

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Offline Hiheels

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Well that puts a new spin on an old classic  :o