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Author Topic: Chicken eggs, gulls eggs, quail eggs, goose eggs...but why can't you buy  (Read 3016 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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Even ostrich eggs. But why can't you buy turkey eggs anywhere?

Turkeys are birds...birds lay eggs. It's what they do, innit? So what happens to all those turkey eggs? Do they taste horrible? Do they just get thrown away?

I can't remember a single TV chef batting on about turkey eggs. Not one.
 
Afterthought....And why can you only buy turkeys in December? What do they do for the rest of the year?

« Last Edit: 16 November, 2013, 05:35:10 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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imfeduptoo

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Turkey eggs
7-8 million turkeys are eaten in the UK each Christmas Day, but their eggs are never sold in shops. The main reason is that turkeys lay less than chickens (around 110 turkey eggs per year as opposed to 300 chicken eggs) so they are relatively expensive and are invariably kept for breeding. (For Christmas, presumably).

BUT -
From this week, the turkey eggs will be nestled among similar gourmet layings from quails and ducks, along with those from the humble chicken.
'Turkey eggs are the most asked-for eggs among our customers,' says Waitrose egg-buyer Frances Westerman.

'They have excellent cooking qualities and, because they're bigger than hens' eggs, you need two instead of three to make a really light sponge cake.'

Turkey eggs have never been on sale before, largely because they lay less frequently than chickens, and because most of the birds are bred for eating at Christmas.

The eggs will be on sale in selected Waitrose stores until the end of August, when the laying season ends, and will cost £1.99 for a pack of two.

And devotees say they're not only richer than a hen's egg, but equally delicious fried, poached or boiled. You may just find that you need a bigger egg cup.

Available at Waitrose stores from 18 April

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-1376012/Why-turkey-eggs-flying-supermarket-shelves.html

« Last Edit: 16 November, 2013, 07:14:21 PM by imfeduptoo »

Offline antonymous

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Even ostrich eggs. But why can't you buy turkey eggs anywhere?

Turkeys are birds...birds lay eggs. It's what they do, innit? So what happens to all those turkey eggs? Do they taste horrible? Do they just get thrown away?

I can't remember a single TV chef batting on about turkey eggs. Not one.
 
Afterthought....And why can you only buy turkeys in December? What do they do for the rest of the year?

*Turkeys and various cuts of turkey meat are on the shelves of my Sainsbros all year.


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Offline P-Kasso2

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*Turkeys and various cuts of turkey meat are on the shelves of my Sainsbros all year.

First, Mrs Too, I was surprised to see that Waitrose sell turkey eggs...but at £1 each I can see there is a curiosity value that might make someone give them a try...whether at £1.99 for a pack of two they will attract a loyal repeat-purchase shopper is less certain.

Still, if they taste as good as it says in your post, I might just become a purchaser myself. But so far no turkey eggs have appeared in Waitrose in Lewes.

Next up, Ant's post...You're right Ant...I have seen bits of turkeys (ie turkey legs and turkey breasts) in supermarkets but not whole turkeys.

Presumably there are good reasons for this...

1  Whole turkeys are just too big? They're OK for big family gatherings but too vast for a family of three or four?

2   Turkeys are far more expensive than chickens etc? The price of turkeys in my local butcher's last Christmas was enough to make me wince in disbelief.

3   Turkeys are traditionally for Christmas and eating turkey everyday would mean turkey becomes no longer special? And some things need to stay special.

I'd add a fourth reason and that is that turkey meat is almost tasteless. I cannot see why turkey has grabbed top slot at the Christmas table.

I'd rather eat mashed balsa wood before I'd waste time on a turkey...but that's just my view and there are millions who'd disagree with me.

As of this minute I have absolutely no idea what Mrs P-K and I will be tucking into on Dec 25th...all I know is we'll be staying at my sister's in Kent and she hates turkey! She makes a fantastic 'traditional juletide' Tiramizu though.

 
« Last Edit: 14 January, 2014, 07:03:41 AM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline antonymous

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"3   Turkeys are traditionally for Christmas and eating turkey everyday would mean turkey becomes no longer special? And some things need to stay special.

I'd add a fourth reason and that is that turkey meat is almost tasteless. I cannot see why turkey has grabbed top slot at the Christmas table.

I'd rather eat mashed balsa wood before I'd waste time on a turkey...but that's just my view and there are millions who'd disagree with me."

I agree wholeheartedly P-K - the reason turkey has become the dish of the day at Christmas is, like most other fads and fashions, a spin off from the USA. (Wild turkeys were an important source of food for the early settlers and they are something of a national tradition)
Here in the UK Goose was the Christmas special meal.
When I was a kid the only time we saw chicken was at christmas - my father used to buy a couple of cockerels in the summer and fatten them up for the festive season.

« Last Edit: 16 November, 2013, 11:12:00 PM by antonymous »
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Offline P-Kasso2

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When I was a kid the only time we saw chicken was at christmas - my father used to buy a couple of cockerels in the summer and fatten them up for the festive season.

It was pretty much the same in our house except when my granny came up from Kent. She kept geese, ducks, chickens and rabbits and would bring us a chicken for the pot.

Eating a chicken in summer when it wasn't even Christmas made us feel very raffish and devil-may-care.

In many ways it's a shame chicken has become everyday. Imagine if we ate Christmas Puds and brandy snaps twice a week...nope, we need to keep things like turkeys special. Humans need special things to celebrate properly with.


« Last Edit: 14 January, 2014, 07:06:25 AM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline Hiheels

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When I was a kid the only time we saw chicken was at christmas - my father used to buy a couple of cockerels in the summer and fatten them up for the festive season.

It was pretty much the same in our house except when my granny came up from Kent. She kept geese, ducks, chickens and rabbits and would bring us a chicken for the pot.

Eating a chicken in in summer when it wasn't even Christmas made us feel very raffish and devil-may-care.

In many ways it's a shame chicken has become everyday. Imagine if we ate Christmas Puds and brandy snaps twice a week...nope, keep things like turkeys special. Humans need special things to celebrate properly with.

Excellent sentiment, I love a sense of occasion. Top notch  :D

Offline P-Kasso2

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Christmas has come and gone and I wonder how many of you had turkey for Christmas or something more unusual?

For Mrs P-K and I at my sisters in Kent we were treated by her phenomenally large shiny new three electric oven'ed, six burner range type cooker with a gas hob-top plus a grill thingy to put all those natty seared lines into things.

Very impressive except that it blew up on the day before Christmas. Great timing!

So with not a bird in sight we tucked into roast pork, roast lamb and hams superbly cooked by a kind friend who lives five or six streets away. Once the panic had died down it was a bit of a kerfuffle but it all went well.

My sister even managed to fry the 'roast' potatoes on the hob and, credit to her cooking skills, they were better than most roast potatoes out of the oven...if she had one.

So what were all you guys scoffing on Christmas day?

« Last Edit: 14 January, 2014, 07:21:28 AM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline seacommander

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Congratulations to your sister P-K. We suffered a similar incident at my parent's house quite a few Christmases ago when the oven packed up part way through the roasting. Luckily a neighbour had two ovens and completed the roast  for us but, unfortunately, still left the washing up to us!!

We had lamb this Christmas. I can't remember when we last had turkey at yuletide; it must be at least 25 years ago.

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Mmm Christmas dinner!!
I was going to do goose one year, but it was prohibitively expensive...so, chicken it was, which is the usual and yummy, with home made stuffing, roast spuds, sprouts, the opportunity of parsnips but I don't like them, gravy, bread sauce, cranberry sauce...ooh, someone stick the oven on!!