!!

Guests can now post!

Welcome to Intelligent Answers.  As a guest, you are now able to post a question, subject to getting through our spam-bot filters.  However, if you want to answer any questions, you will need to register.  Thanks for visting!  (BTW - guests cannot post links, and if you post spam, we will block your IP and report you to every spam protection site we can find - we work hard to keep this site spam free for the benefit and enjoyment of our members!)

Author Topic: Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?  (Read 2755 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

  • Awaiting inspiration.
  • PK unique
  • University Councillor
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 54
  • -Receive: 164
  • Posts: 12298
  • Helpfulness: 214
  • January 2011 prize-quiz winner.
Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?
« on: 12 September, 2013, 05:53:27 PM »
Great invention. World class. But does anyone know where Yorkshire Puddings originated?
"I live in hope"

Offline P-Kasso2

  • Awaiting inspiration.
  • PK unique
  • University Councillor
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 54
  • -Receive: 164
  • Posts: 12298
  • Helpfulness: 214
  • January 2011 prize-quiz winner.
Re: Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?
« Reply #1 on: 16 September, 2013, 03:05:32 PM »
This is a Yorkshire Pudding...just thought I'd jog your memories in case anybody knows who invented Yorkshire puds but is being a bit shy about answering.

"I live in hope"

Offline antonymous

  • Perpendicular Galileo Galilei
  • Founder
  • Marie Curie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 92
  • -Receive: 133
  • Posts: 2016
  • Helpfulness: 168
  • "We're all bankers now!"
    • Antonymous2011 Flickr Page
Re: Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?
« Reply #2 on: 16 September, 2013, 03:27:01 PM »
Originally a north country dish 'Dripping pudding'  was cooked in the oven under the roast meat to absorb the fat .

"1747 in The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse under the title of 'Yorkshire pudding'. It was she who re-invented and renamed the original version, called Dripping Pudding, which had been cooked in England for centuries, although these puddings were much flatter than the puffy versions known today." wiki
“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. Sometimes it'svice versa"

Offline P-Kasso2

  • Awaiting inspiration.
  • PK unique
  • University Councillor
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 54
  • -Receive: 164
  • Posts: 12298
  • Helpfulness: 214
  • January 2011 prize-quiz winner.
Re: Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?
« Reply #3 on: 16 September, 2013, 06:50:50 PM »
Originally a north country dish 'Dripping pudding'  was cooked in the oven under the roast meat to absorb the fat .

"1747 in The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse under the title of 'Yorkshire pudding'. It was she who re-invented and renamed the original version, called Dripping Pudding, which had been cooked in England for centuries, although these puddings were much flatter than the puffy versions known today." wiki

Now that seems to make a lot of sense but it must have been a very different animal to the magnificent YPs we know today.

Today, everyone from St Delia upwards says that the oil on the pan HAS to be bubbling hot before you tip the YP mixture in if you want a towering immaculate YP.

Hannah Glasse must have been content with a pretty turgid, flat affair. Did she also invent the Frisbee?
"I live in hope"

Offline Duffield1

  • Founder member and wannabe deity.
  • Administrator
  • Maria Montessori
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 61
  • -Receive: 36
  • Posts: 2503
  • Helpfulness: 67
  • I ain't nothing but a hound dawg...
Re: Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?
« Reply #4 on: 16 September, 2013, 06:58:26 PM »
Indeed, I read somewhere that a Yorkshire Pudding should not be so-called if it is shorted in height than four inches, but that seems a bit extreme.  Some of my Yorkshire friends still insist on having them as a starter daubed in jam.

Offline antonymous

  • Perpendicular Galileo Galilei
  • Founder
  • Marie Curie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 92
  • -Receive: 133
  • Posts: 2016
  • Helpfulness: 168
  • "We're all bankers now!"
    • Antonymous2011 Flickr Page
Re: Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?
« Reply #5 on: 16 September, 2013, 10:31:56 PM »
Indeed, I read somewhere that a Yorkshire Pudding should not be so-called if it is shorted in height than four inches, but that seems a bit extreme.  Some of my Yorkshire friends still insist on having them as a starter daubed in jam.
In our house we used to have a second helping with jam for our afters (sweet these days)!
“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. Sometimes it'svice versa"

Offline Hiheels

  • Founder member, in the naughty corner for smoking in the café.
  • Founder
  • Chancellor
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 123
  • -Receive: 82
  • Posts: 5060
  • Helpfulness: 677
  • Yes, yes, very nice. Now put it away.
Re: Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?
« Reply #6 on: 16 September, 2013, 10:37:50 PM »
Indeed, I read somewhere that a Yorkshire Pudding should not be so-called if it is shorted in height than four inches, but that seems a bit extreme.  Some of my Yorkshire friends still insist on having them as a starter daubed in jam.
In our house we used to have a second helping with jam for our afters (sweet these days)!

We had similar, just with Golden Syrup.

Offline P-Kasso2

  • Awaiting inspiration.
  • PK unique
  • University Councillor
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 54
  • -Receive: 164
  • Posts: 12298
  • Helpfulness: 214
  • January 2011 prize-quiz winner.
Re: Are Yorkshire Puddings really a Yorkshire invention?
« Reply #7 on: 17 September, 2013, 06:19:13 AM »
When I was a kid my mother's speciality was a Yorkshire Pud with sultanas in it and then sprinkled with sugar.

Seriously
good! Custard optional (but you try telling that to a greedy kid).

I don't know if she made up the recipe herself or whether it is a recognise twist on the YP theme but you could eat her amazing Sultana YP hot or cold, standing up, sitting down or clenched in your fist as you ran out to play. Anybody else experienced the delights of Yorkshire Pud and Sultanas? 

Like Heels's family, my granny also used to blow away us kids with Yorkshire Pud a la Golden Syrup. I think growing up with post-war sugar rationing just made the Golden Syrup Years even more spectacular. Guaranteed sugar shock!

Just the thought of fistfuls of her massive helpings of Pud and lashings of Golden Syrup makes me drool and slobber with unquenchable deja vu. Kids today dunno what they are missing!
"I live in hope"