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Author Topic: Sentence or sentance?  (Read 76833 times)

TheGreyRabbit

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #45 on: 09 April, 2016, 07:12:49 PM »
Well, I didn't go to grammar school, I'm not even over 30 years old, but I too was taught there was a difference between sentence and sentance. I couldn't remember which was which and that's what brought me here, only to discover sentance, apparently, is not even used anymore. I distinctly remember being taught to remember the difference between them in 4th grade, at my Canadian school. This was by the same teacher who made sure we knew the words gaol, tyre, and several other spellings that Canadians simply don't use anymore. So, it's an old spelling, that I should try and scrape off of the old brain banana, or not. As one of my English professors told me in College, "there's nothing wrong with using outdated spellings, I actually like seeing them, just do it either consistently or not at all."

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #46 on: 09 April, 2016, 08:28:26 PM »
Well, I didn't go to grammar school, I'm not even over 30 years old, but I too was taught there was a difference between sentence and sentance. I couldn't remember which was which and that's what brought me here, only to discover sentance, apparently, is not even used anymore. I distinctly remember being taught to remember the difference between them in 4th grade, at my Canadian school. This was by the same teacher who made sure we knew the words gaol, tyre, and several other spellings that Canadians simply don't use anymore. So, it's an old spelling, that I should try and scrape off of the old brain banana, or not. As one of my English professors told me in College, "there's nothing wrong with using outdated spellings, I actually like seeing them, just do it either consistently or not at all."

That's good advice from what must have been a very good teacher.
Just don't try to do it in England where there are grammar gestapo lurking round every corner waiting to shoot mis-spellers down.

Meself I dont give a dam how peeple spel so long as it komunikates ok.Thats wot langwij is for and the rest is hair splitting twoddle. The olr song was wrong... It aint the way you say it, its wot you say that gets results.
« Last Edit: 09 April, 2016, 08:33:37 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline ReeseR59

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #47 on: 04 April, 2018, 10:26:37 PM »
All the way through school (50 years ago) I was taught:  "The criminal will be sentanced and the judge will state it in a sentence."

This was on my SAT in 1976, and was considered a fatal error in a college application.

WikiDiff says the word sentence is obsolete.  I'm happy with that.  No more confusion.  This likely happened in an AP Style Book change long ago.  Just as we used to say, "The man PLED guilty," we now say, "The man PLEADED guilty."

Offline Duffield1

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #48 on: 10 April, 2018, 12:32:35 PM »
WikiDiff says the word sentence is obsolete.  I'm happy with that.  No more confusion.  This likely happened in an AP Style Book change long ago.  Just as we used to say, "The man PLED guilty," we now say, "The man PLEADED guilty."

WikiDiff says that 'sentence' meaning 'sense, meaning or significance' is obsolete.  Sentence is still both a verb and a noun, and in English.  'Sentance', by contrast, does not seem to exist as a word in any of the online dictionaries I have checked. 

As a law graduate, I also continue to use 'pleaded'...