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Author Topic: Sentence or sentance?  (Read 76889 times)

Offline antonymous

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #15 on: 29 November, 2014, 06:28:26 PM »
Re would of/would have ................we had a little discussion about this in here many moons ago when one of our contributors used the abomination 'would of' - its just the lazy english and their pronunciation that are the cause of many such calumnies. My pet hate - and it is absolutely rife - is the use of 'goes' in place of 'said' or 'muttered' or 'shouted' or 'whispered'....etc.

As for sentance - I went to a better class of grammar school (1952 - 56) and this aberration was not on the curriculum - so I am puzzled as to how so many lousy english teachers got onto the payroll.

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imfeduptoo

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #16 on: 29 November, 2014, 06:31:16 PM »
Hi. I've just Registered to talk with you guys after Googling sentence/sentance and finding this site.

I'm intrigued as to how many of us were actually TAUGHT in school the difference between "sentence" and "sentance", and then in later years, be informed that the word "sentance" had never existed! Were our educations an International group figment of our imaginations, or were our teachers, as suggested elsewhere, en-masse, not up to their jobs? (if the latter, it begs the question, "Well, who taught them about this non-word?).

I've always thought that the early teaching of English that I received 60 years ago (when I was seven) was pretty good. By this age, I had learnt to compose a letter correctly, and knew, for example, whether to sign off with "Yours Faithfully" or "Yours Sincerely". It was at about the same time that I was taught which of the words in question to use, and when.

The differing spellings and usage of sentence and sentance continued throughout my schooling until I left Grammar School in '62.

Incidentally, for anyone reading this who is wondering, "If he was taught about these words as a kid, why was he Googling them?", the answer's simple. I'm starting to forget stuff - even a few words that I know I could once spell, I now sometimes have to double-check on! (strangely though, I'm still able to spell out loud "antidisestablishmentarianism" which I practiced as a kid (for some unknown reason) in under 4 seconds - although this little exercise is carried out strictly in private!).


PS. My current pet hate is the increasing use of the written "would of" instead of "would have"! What's that about?
 rolls eyes


Oooh! I hate that too.
And people saying less when they mean fewer. I've heard TV/radio presenters and politicians make this mistake.
And people who say 'Myself' when they should say 'Me'.
And people who start sentences with 'And'!
All the people that I know who were taught that sentance is a word went to Grammar School so I find it hard to believe that the teachers were not up to their jobs, We had excellent teachers.


Offline antonymous

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #17 on: 29 November, 2014, 09:38:16 PM »
It would appear that sentance was in use in the 17th century when spelling was still a bit anarchic if not archaic;eg Maior for Mayor,accusars for accusers, clerke for clerk, lyes etc etc.:



Extract attached.
« Last Edit: 30 November, 2014, 08:09:43 AM by antonymous »
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Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #18 on: 02 December, 2014, 01:34:18 PM »
Nice answer, Ant. Proofe thatte English doth change all ye tyme. And long may it continue to do so.
"I live in hope"

Offline antonymous

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #19 on: 02 December, 2014, 03:55:25 PM »
Nice answer, Ant. Proofe thatte English doth change all ye tyme. And long may it continue to do so.

One could say, in modern parlance, that it is a work in progress. :D
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Maximillian

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #20 on: 07 December, 2014, 02:31:06 PM »
I too was taught that there is a difference between the two.  It must be a part of the Cambridge dialect, there to distinguish us from the overly well educated plebeians in the rest of the world.

dan

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #21 on: 07 February, 2015, 05:25:42 AM »
Maybe Mr.too just had to have too spellings of the word.

Firkinboo

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #22 on: 28 July, 2015, 11:13:41 AM »
Hi there,
I was also taught 'sentence' for words, and 'sentance' for gaol / jail - I agree with the previous posters that the internet seems to be treated as an 'authority' now, but that doesn't necessarily mean anything!

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #23 on: 28 July, 2015, 01:55:24 PM »
I still say that spelling sentence as 'sentance' is orl rong. But who knows where English will evolve to? Just sit tight and enjoy the ride!
"I live in hope"

Offline clinicalthinker

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #24 on: 11 September, 2015, 05:24:02 PM »
I also went to school in California from 1945 until 1959. We were also taught sentence (a group of words) sentance (punishment)

So how did I get here and why?
My spellcheck showed my sentance as misspelled.

My why ended me here.

Unfortunate I sent my 60 year old 4 inch thick Websters to the good will about a year ago.
Hopefully someone finds it more useful than I find the internet today ;)

Offline Hiheels

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #25 on: 11 September, 2015, 05:59:20 PM »
I also went to school in California from 1945 until 1959. We were also taught sentence (a group of words) sentance (punishment)

So how did I get here and why?
My spellcheck showed my sentance as misspelled.

My why ended me here.

Unfortunate I sent my 60 year old 4 inch thick Websters to the good will about a year ago.
Hopefully someone finds it more useful than I find the internet today ;)

Excellent! It's nice to know we are the gold at the end of the "why?" rainbow  Joy__

Ian Gilmour

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #26 on: 17 September, 2015, 05:15:45 AM »
I was recently writing a slightly cynical commentry about another repetition in the history of Australian politics:

"At least Clive Palmer and Malcom Turnbull may be responsible for their own sentances."

This only works, as a double-edged Sword of Damacles, if the two meanings of the word are spelt differently, otherwise it's only a spelling mistake, or at best, a homonym, with no apologies to our previous, possibly homęphobic PM.

Like many others, I looked up a few thick paper dictionaries without being able to confirm or deny the existance of the prior spelling.
I don't have my late father's Oxford dictionary; the full version took up more than a metre [c. 39 inches] of bookshelves.  He was an English History teacher, and he would have easily explained the early etymology, such as whether the Middle English spelling involved a dipthong.

I phoned my wife, who was educated at a very well established school in the 1960s, and is regarded as the spelling expert in our immediate family;
she was taught that 'sentance' existed, and did not refer to a grammatical string of words.

My vote is simply to re-instate the old spelling of sentance, to denote a form or term of punishment, usually handed out by a judge or magistrate.
If people can invent new words and have them added to Websters' and Macquarie dictionaries, we should be able to take charge of the language, to ensure greater clarity and to maintain such important distinctions.

BTW, I was informed, also, at a grammar school in the 1960s, that antidisestablishmentarianism was the longest English word; this may no longer be the case.

imfeduptoo

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #27 on: 17 September, 2015, 04:50:13 PM »
I was recently writing a slightly cynical commentry about another repetition in the history of Australian politics:

"At least Clive Palmer and Malcom Turnbull may be responsible for their own sentances."

This only works, as a double-edged Sword of Damacles, if the two meanings of the word are spelt differently, otherwise it's only a spelling mistake, or at best, a homonym, with no apologies to our previous, possibly homęphobic PM.

Like many others, I looked up a few thick paper dictionaries without being able to confirm or deny the existance of the prior spelling.
I don't have my late father's Oxford dictionary; the full version took up more than a metre [c. 39 inches] of bookshelves.  He was an English History teacher, and he would have easily explained the early etymology, such as whether the Middle English spelling involved a dipthong.

I phoned my wife, who was educated at a very well established school in the 1960s, and is regarded as the spelling expert in our immediate family;
she was taught that 'sentance' existed, and did not refer to a grammatical string of words.

My vote is simply to re-instate the old spelling of sentance, to denote a form or term of punishment, usually handed out by a judge or magistrate.
If people can invent new words and have them added to Websters' and Macquarie dictionaries, we should be able to take charge of the language, to ensure greater clarity and to maintain such important distinctions.

BTW, I was informed, also, at a grammar school in the 1960s, that antidisestablishmentarianism was the longest English word; this may no longer be the case.

I'll second that vote!
Re:- Antidisestablishmentarianism - In our first English Language lesson at Grammar school the teacher wrote Anti.....................ism on the board, along with some misspelt words that we were meant to correct.
Needless to say, none of us got that one!
We were also taught never to use the word 'got' but I just did!

TorontoGeekGirl

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #28 on: 17 November, 2015, 04:04:42 AM »
I was also taught sentance at some point in my life. I was raised/educated in Canada, where were you raised/educated?

I feel like this is one of those regional things.

Maybe?

DAVEYO

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Re: Sentence or sentance?
« Reply #29 on: 23 November, 2015, 06:52:08 PM »
A for legal spelling