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Author Topic: Are there any kosher insects?  (Read 1626 times)

Offline siasl

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Are there any kosher insects?
« on: 21 March, 2013, 02:32:32 PM »
How about Halal?

Offline antonymous

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Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Are there any kosher insects?
« Reply #2 on: 21 March, 2013, 02:57:41 PM »
As far as I know insects were not regarded in Biblical times as being edible and were not therefore mentioned in terms of kosher-ness.

Therefore they can be eaten by Jews with no thought of whether they are kosher.

Insects simply fall outside the guidelines and I suppose, from the vast height of my general ignorance in these matters, the only thing stopping a Jew from eating insects would be their squeamishness.
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Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Are there any kosher insects?
« Reply #4 on: 21 March, 2013, 09:11:33 PM »
Are locusts OK under halal rules? It seems they very much are.

Halal essentially divides eateable and non-eatable living creatures into three clear categories…

Firstly, Plants, Fruits, Vegetables and Grains (These, in broad brush, can all be eaten so long as they are not poisonous or narcotic. Sensible.)

Secondly, Land Creatures. ..and this is where eating insects comes in.

Then there are Birds but we can skip over those.

The website “Islamic-Laws.com” states the following rules about eating land animals (and I have emboldened the little section about insects, and specifically locusts, to make it clearer and easier for you to skim past all the not-so-relevant intro paras)…

“Allah has permitted the eating of some and forbidden others. The first five verses of Sura 5 Ma'idah give a summary of the commands regarding what is permitted to eat.

Amongst domestic animals, camels, cows, goats and sheep are permissible to eat. They all possess a hoof or cloven hoof. From amongst wild animals, which mean animals that are not normally kept in enclosures, mountain sheep, wild cows and asses, gazelles and deer are permitted.

It is Makruh (undesirable) to eat the meat of a horse, donkey or mule.

It is not permitted to eat the meat of animals that possess canine teeth or fangs. Examples of such animals that are sometimes eaten by man are dogs, rabbits, elephants and monkeys. There are specific verses in the Holy Qur'an forbidding the eating of a pig.

It is not permitted to eat reptiles such as snakes and tortoises. Insects such as fleas and lice are also forbidden. However, locusts are permissible.”


Even with this blanket approval of scoffing locusts, the locusts still must be slaughtered according to strict rules. As the same website points out, this means…

“The correct method of slaughtering involves the simultaneous cutting of the gullet, windpipe, carotid artery and jugular vein of the animal with a sharp knife. The conditions for the slaughtering are as below:

-1 The one who carries out the slaughtering must be a Muslim.
-2 If possible, the instrument used to slaughter should be made of iron.
-3 The creature to be slaughtered must be made to face the Holy Ka'aba.
-4The person performing the slaughter must mention the name of Allah as he slaughters the animal.
-5 Here must be a normal emission of blood from the animal after the slaughter.
-6 The animal must show some sign of movement after being slaughtered, especially if there was some doubt whether the animal was alive before being slaughtered.

However if a Muslim has slaughtered it as per his own sects fiqh rules ,which do not comply with all ?of the above ,the meat can still be considered as Halal”


http://www.islamic-laws.com/halalharamfooddrinks.htm

I do not know how easy or otherwise it is to find a locust’s carotid artery and jugular vein or how easy or difficult it is to make the locusts about to slaughtered face towards the Holy Ka'aba but locusts are definitely on the menu under Halal rules.

« Last Edit: 21 March, 2013, 09:21:06 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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