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Author Topic: An intriguing chef's hat question....Is it true what my tapas chef friend just  (Read 5308 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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An intriguing chef's hat question....Is it true what my tapas chef friend just told me?

He (Dom) kindly popped round to our new cottage to whip up this amazing meal of Hake that Mrs P-K had bought from the riverside fishmonger. Dom said he'd make Hake a la Espanola.

I opened the  door and there he is standing there wearing a toque (aka a chef's floppy white hat).

Over the Hake (which Dom brilliantly brilliantly cooked in thyme, tarragon, lemon mint and marjoram from our garden plus a load of other bits and bobs) he said that the number of pleats in a chef's hat was terribly significant.

"Oh yes" quoth I disbelievingly as I munched away merrily.

"Oh yes indeed" he replied and explained that (wait for it!) he'd been told this astounding fact by a French chef he'd met in North China and that the whole reason was that the number of little pleats in a chef's hat actually signified the total number of way there are to cook eggs....120 or something. Maybe more.

We didn't count the pleats on his chef's hat but 125 seemed about right as we moved effortlessly on to the fino sherry.

"And anothing thing"
says Dom "a junior chef has far fewer pleats in his/her toque. Only top chefs get the full 125 pleats. Junior chefs only get a dozen or so". Like the one in the pic above.

Now Dom, our doorstepping chef, is pretty well known in Lewes and environs for his remarkable memory and for stories that sometimes sound far more interesting than the plain unadorned truth.

Was he spinning a colourful yarn? Was the French chef in China telling him porkies?

Or is there some truth in chefs' hats, that every single pleat represents one more diffferent way of cooking an egg?
« Last Edit: 06 August, 2012, 06:06:40 AM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline siasl

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There would appear to be a grain of truth to what he said:

http://www.younggourmet.com/a/32.html

As to whether the "100 ways of cooking an egg" had particular conditions attached to it regarding percentage of the final dish that must be egg, or number of other ingredients, I don't know.

Perhaps we could enumerate methods and see how far we get....

Offline P-Kasso2

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So, Siasl, my friend Dom was right. Not 125 pleats though but 100.

Now, as you suggested, let's start numbering the different ways to cook an egg...and see if we get to 100...

1   Boiled Egg

2   Fried Egg

3   Eggs Florentine

4   Scrambled Eggs

5   Spanish Omelette...

OK over to you!
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Offline Hiheels

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6. Benedict;

7. En cocotte;

8. Poached.

Offline siasl

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Boiled egg splits into "hard" and "soft".
Fried egg subdivides into runny & hard, sunny side up or flipped (easy over?).
En cocotte benefits from the hard/soft choice, according to Delia: http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/main-ingredient/eggs/eggs-en-cocotte.html
I imagine so does poached egg

so there's 6 more from the existing list.

further entries:
15. Pickled eggs
16. Thousand year eggs

I wonder if we allow for different species egg variants, too.... (chicken, duck, quail, ostrich, are possibly the commonest, but add in any avian and possibly also look to the reptilian genus, too)

Offline antonymous

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17. Egg Foo Yung
18. Tea Eggs
19. Egg Custard
20. Egg Fried Rice
21. Coddled egg
22. Basted Egg
23 Shirred Egg
24. Balut (addled ducks eggs)
25. Egg Brik
26. Chawanmushi
27.Bai pong moun
28. Bai pong moun c'loc
29.Bai pong moun mool
30.Bong moun ngpong

Carry on London!
“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. Sometimes it'svice versa"

Offline siasl

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31. Meringue (soft with a nice gooey centre)
32. Meringue (hard)
33. A variant of custard that consists of 1 egg and 50g of sugar whipped up until is goes a bit stiff - I (and my Norsky family) call it eggidosis (eggy-dose-iss) and it's yummy with sour fruits like redcurrants)

Does caviar count? If so, continue from 35, otherwise use 34 :)
« Last Edit: 06 August, 2012, 02:18:30 PM by siasl »

Offline Duffield1

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33. A variant of custard that consists of 1 egg and 50g of sugar whipped up until is goes a bit stiff - I (and my Norsky family) call it eggidosis (eggy-dose-iss) and it's yummy with sour fruits like redcurrants)

I'm intrigued by this - as my diet continues, I wonder if it would be possible to make this with sweetener, thus making a delicious (and free on Slimming World) dessert?  How do you make and cook it?

Offline siasl

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33. A variant of custard that consists of 1 egg and 50g of sugar whipped up until is goes a bit stiff - I (and my Norsky family) call it eggidosis (eggy-dose-iss) and it's yummy with sour fruits like redcurrants)
I'm intrigued by this - as my diet continues, I wonder if it would be possible to make this with sweetener, thus making a delicious (and free on Slimming World) dessert?  How do you make and cook it?
Take one mixing bowl. Add 1 medium egg, add approx 50g sugar (I use caster, but regular granulated seems fine too). Take one leccy whisk and apply to contents of bowl until desired consistency reached. Eat (and all the salmonella-sayers can be damned!).

I suspect sweeteners won't work as it's basically making a meringue mix with added yolk - can you make meringue with sweeteners? This stuff doesn't stiffen up quite as much, though, it maxes out at a consistency a bit runnier than ambrosia custard. Less sugar means a runnier mix, so I wonder if the sugar granules help form bubbles.

Edit: whaddya know, you can get fake granulated sugar: http://www.sugarfreerecipes.co.uk/no-sugar-meringues.html Note that there is no application of any heat source in this "custard"
« Last Edit: 06 August, 2012, 03:31:29 PM by siasl »

Offline P-Kasso2

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33. A variant of custard that consists of 1 egg and 50g of sugar whipped up until is goes a bit stiff - I (and my Norsky family) call it eggidosis (eggy-dose-iss) and it's yummy with sour fruits like redcurrants)

I'm intrigued by this - as my diet continues, I wonder if it would be possible to make this with sweetener, thus making a delicious (and free on Slimming World) dessert?  How do you make and cook it?

Come on all you fatties and foodies! Back on theme. I thought we were counting ways to cook eggs not counting calories!  ;)

So...

31   Pancakes!

32   Bearnais sauce

33   Buck Rabbit (ie welsh rarebit with an egg on top)

34   Mayonnaise

35  Aubergine and tomato baked eggs

OK I cheated on that one and went to http://www.eggrecipes.co.uk/recipes/browse

Which is also  where I got…

32   Banoffee pancakes (not sure if fillings count as different ways to cook an egg because basically the eggs are stlll cooked the same way…but that would also disqualify Siasl’s soft boiled eggs /  hard boiled eggs variations as two separate categories etc. But let it stand?).

Only 68 to go!
« Last Edit: 07 August, 2012, 08:35:05 AM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline siasl

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In foaming at the mouth at the off-topic posts, you missed my (now renumbered):

36. Meringue (soft with a nice gooey centre)
37. Meringue (hard)
38. A variant of custard that consists of 1 egg and 50g of sugar whipped up until is goes a bit stiff - I (and my Norsky family) call it eggidosis (eggy-dose-iss) and it's yummy with sour fruits like redcurrants)

Does caviar count? If so, continue from 40, otherwise use 39 :)