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Author Topic: Microwave question…Can you cook a Bacon and Suet Pudding in a microwave? If so,  (Read 4784 times)

Online P-Kasso2

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Microwave question…Can you cook a Bacon and Suet Pudding in a microwave? If so, for how long? And are there any tricks to look out for?

                                                                                 
Winter drawers on…and thoughts in the servants' wing at P-K Towers are rapidly turning to comfort foods. I know how to steam a Bacon Pud the regular way (thanks Mum) as easy as pie. What I am desperately hoping is that Bacon Puds done in the Microwave are A) every bit as tasty as a 'proper' steamed one but B) about an hour and a half faster. Are they?

So, any tricks I need to know? And, more important, how long do I need to bop it for? Mine is an '850' microwave for timing purposes.

PS Doncha think Miss Piggy bears a striking resemblance to the lovely Nigella Lawson?  :P
« Last Edit: 16 November, 2011, 03:06:38 PM by P-Kasso2 »

Offline Hiheels

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I'm afraid I can't help with timings (not least that it would depend on the size of yer puddn, but also that I haven't ever done one), but a quick tip is to make sure you stand the pudding basin in a microwaveable outer container that has water in it, then cover the whole shebang so microwaveable cling film covers the top of the basin that has the pudding in it and also extends out to be folded around the edge of the water container (holes in the clingfilm of course)...does that description make sense or am I drivelling on  ???

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Yep, Heels...that makes eminent sense and (not being a great fan of micros except to reheat yesterday's left-overs) was total news to me, but...

The big question for me now is 'How long do I bop it for?'. I can't keep opening the door evry 30 secs, unwrapping the clingfilm and prodding the pud with a fork.

Size-wise the pud will be big enough for four but no bigger.

Offline Hiheels

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The good folks here http://www.allotments4all.co.uk/smf/index.php?topic=64189.0 have had a bit of a chat about it and it would appear to be about 15 mins in a 750 turned down low/medium.
Are you able to adjust the power of yours? If not, going on finger in the wind technology, plus having and using a microwave myself, I'd probably do it for about 6 mins full blast then whip it out and check on progress.

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Thanks for digging round the allotment site, Heels...I'd been in that site several times in the past but
didn't realise that among the slugs and aphids they also did a nifty line in suet pud recipes!

Now, having read right through the thread, I think that microwaving a suet pud seems like far
too much kerfuffle.

So steaming it will be...I'll just set the alarm on my mobile to ring every 15 minutes so I can check on
the magnificent pud's progress.

Offline Hiheels

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Pics or it didn't happen  :D

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Don't quite know when it'll be steaming on to the table Heels because, true confession time, I am not cooking it personally. But when it is done I will post an 'Exhibit A' proof of existence piccy.

This is a joint suet venture with another foodie friend (my mate the Double Bass Playing Botanist) who, despite being 84 years old, is a very nimble cook and totally doolally about micros and all kitchen gadgets electronical. Makes Heston Blooomingheck look like an old fart.

For the next three weeks, my mate the Double Bass Playing Botanist is knee deep in rehearsals for an Elgar concert coming up alarmingly fast on Dec 6th.

As it is already almost impossible with his more-than-ample stomach to get close enough to the double bass we felt it was best to delay the pud until post-Elgar.

I just had a totally unonnected thought...I actually have TWO double bass playing friends...one the sai Botanist and the other now retired who, in his yooth, actually played double bass in Georgie Fame and The  Blue Flames. How about that, pop-pickers! Now there's co-incidence and neither of them know each other.

On the six steps to fame theory, through these two double bassists I am probably linked to every rocker who ever was and teo very tree, plant, weed and slug in the world!

Not many people can say that!
« Last Edit: 17 November, 2011, 10:52:05 AM by P-Kasso2 »

Offline tecspec

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    • Soosie Wales
I have done a steamed suet pud - sweet version- in the microwave. Like Hi-Heels says though you will need to turn the power down. I found that when it was hot it was fine but as it cools the pud got tough.

I have made xmas puds in the microwave for years and always get compliments!! I make them about 6 weeks before xmas (oh heck... not started them yet!!!) and wrap and store them in the salad box in the fridge. When you want some cut slices and heat for about 30/60 secs - depending on the size and pour over your cream and Baileys.. Job done!!

I've never heard of the pud you want to cook so have been taking a look see on the web. One thing you'll need to bear in mind is that the pastry will not brown or go crisp like it would when you steam it conventionally. But if you have with gravy or sauce I doubt that would matter.

Why not make a small one to begin with??

My xmas puds go in 2pint basin about 2/3rds full, cover with cling and stab a few holes to release steam. MW power down to medium (guessing about half power on 1000w) and cook for about 6 mins. I then take it out and check the top, if it looks a little liquid in the centre I chuck it in for another minute.

Don't forget we want results!!
;-)

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Thanks tecspec…I might just take up your idea of having a test run on a small pud first…and 6 minutes for a 2 pinter sounds pretty good. Better than an hour and a half in a kitchen like a free sauna with steamy windows.

I have been following up Heels's in-depth field research and checking out swathes of other allotment sites with recipes, specifically pudding recipes and the buzz word ‘microwave’.

Just found this snazzy recipe for Leek & Caerphilly Pudding which the author, (the eponymous Granny Dumpling at

http://www.allotment.org.uk/recipe/31/recipe-for-leek-caerphilly-pudding)

says is a veggie version of steak & kidney pudding done in the micro. So, a Bacon and Onion version must cook about the same. No?

Anyway, here is Granny Dumpling’s recommended suet pudding micro-ing technique…I've added the ingredients at the end in case you want to try this Leek and Caerphilly whatnot at home……

Her method
1.Mix the suet, flour, bi-carb, salt & pepper then add enough water to make a non sticky dough.
2.Saute leeks and onions, until just soft.
3.Prepare a pudding bowl, lightly grease inside with oil or margarine.
4.Roll out 2/3rd of dough to line your dish.
5.Put the cooked leeks & onions into lined bowl & add sauce.
6.Then roll out 1/3rd to make a lid for the pie.
7.Cover top of pudding bowl with a loose covering of cling film. (She doesn't mention stabbing holes in the clingfilm although I'd think that was vital to avoid the Bhopal effect).8.Chill till nearly ready to serve.
9.Then microwave at power 600/750 watts for 9 mins, serve instantly.
(or you can steam this pud for 1 and a half hours in a pot of boiling water)

Ingredients
Pastry:
•4 oz. Beef or Vegitarian Suet
(she can't spell but boy can that Granny Dumpling cook!)
•8 oz self raising flour (white or brown)
•2/3 oz cold water
•1/2 teaspoon each of salt & white pepper.
•1/2 teaspoon bi-carb
Filling:
•1/2  pint of  Caerphilly (or any crumbly white cheese) cheese sauce.
•1lb sliced fresh leeks.
•1  Spanish onion thinly sliced.




« Last Edit: 17 November, 2011, 11:58:39 AM by P-Kasso2 »