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Author Topic: Children  (Read 2707 times)

Offline antonymous

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Children
« on: 08 November, 2011, 11:42:29 PM »
"Half of Britons think today’s children are ‘animals’, a shocking new survey reveals.
Modern day kids are branded “feral, violent and angry” by adults who have effectively given up on the young generation.
The study, commissioned by Barnardo’s, shows 49 per cent of the UK public hold a negative view of all children."

Are you one of the 49 or 51%?

http://uk.lifestyle.yahoo.com/half-britons-think-children-violent-abusive-140000790.html
« Last Edit: 08 November, 2011, 11:44:31 PM by antonymous »
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Offline hdtg

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Re: Children
« Reply #1 on: 09 November, 2011, 12:09:27 AM »
No more than we all are. Children are exactly what we train them to be as parents and wider society. As a society we spoon feed children negativity and act as if they are things we simply don't like very much. No wonder they grow up feeling disenfranchised.

We don't even listen to them overall, the amount of adults who have attempted to talk over my children is a disgrace. It is almost as if they consider children unworthy of the good manners they expect to receive.

They are little blank pages which are waiting for us to write on, sadly we more often then not, fail to write the good stuff

Offline antonymous

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Re: Children
« Reply #2 on: 09 November, 2011, 07:18:49 AM »
No more than we all are. Children are exactly what we train them to be as parents and wider society. As a society we spoon feed children negativity and act as if they are things we simply don't like very much. No wonder they grow up feeling disenfranchised.

We don't even listen to them overall, the amount of adults who have attempted to talk over my children is a disgrace. It is almost as if they consider children unworthy of the good manners they expect to receive.

They are little blank pages which are waiting for us to write on, sadly we more often then not, fail to write the good stuff

I'll take that as '51' then  :D
« Last Edit: 09 November, 2011, 07:20:40 AM by antonymous »
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Offline tecspec

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Re: Children
« Reply #3 on: 09 November, 2011, 09:14:59 AM »
It all comes down to nurture not nature.

There are some specifics that make some (including me) think that children these days are not like children of my generation.

1. Teaching methods - IMHO I don't think a teacher can teach without being infront of the class and all children paying attention. Teachers have become childminders and children teach themselves. No wonder SOME can't spell, read or do simple maths. It's a travesty to see how some don't seem to be able to write or spell or know simple maths. Some of the agents that worked for me used to put it down to being dyslexic! What utter bull!!

2. Children are encouraged to call everyone by their first name. I'm in my 50s and if I see our old next door neighbour I still call her Mrs. Kidd I wouldn't dream of calling her by her first name. When I started working everyone I worked with called each other Mr, Mrs, or Miss and the only time first names were used was in the staff room. I think this instills a feeling of respect for your elders.

3. We live in a society where everyone wants the latest thing, be it phones, tv or other items. When we got married  30+ years ago we were more than happy to have second hand anything. They are more than happy to go into debt for everything they 'need'. The only I've had is a mortgage and I'm very proud of that.

4. Teenagers starting work expect to be able to have their mobile phone on, be able to listen to music, have access to Facebook/twitter/Instant messenger when they are supposed to be working. Ask them to turn off the mobile or restrict access to websites and you're given a load of abuse.

We need to teach children to value what they have and if that's less than other people then that's ok.

I grew up on a council estate with Mum, 3 siblings, Nan and my mums 2 brothers all in the same house. My mum worked all her life to give us a good grounding in life. We many not have had the best of everything but we appreciated what we had and I wish now I could tell my mum what an exceptional job she did. It must have been bliddy hard to cope at times!

AND of course my sons are perfect... ;)
;-)

Offline antonymous

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Re: Children
« Reply #4 on: 09 November, 2011, 10:51:56 AM »
It all comes down to nurture not nature.

AND of course my sons are perfect... ;)

I'll take that as another '51' then. :D
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Offline Hiheels

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Re: Children
« Reply #5 on: 09 November, 2011, 11:27:53 AM »
'Orrible little noisy, messy things. Hanging's too good for 'em.

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Children
« Reply #6 on: 09 November, 2011, 02:30:16 PM »
Kids are like pets and their 'owners'. They start to look like each other and have the same habits.

So the real question is should half of parents be allowed to have whelps?

I'm pretty sure from experience that there are plenty of feral parents kicking about about...fortunately they don't have the energy levels of teenagers.


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Offline Socrates II

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Re: Children
« Reply #7 on: 12 November, 2011, 08:17:57 PM »
No more than we all are. Children are exactly what we train them to be as parents and wider society. As a society we spoon feed children negativity and act as if they are things we simply don't like very much. No wonder they grow up feeling disenfranchised.

We don't even listen to them overall, the amount of adults who have attempted to talk over my children is a disgrace. It is almost as if they consider children unworthy of the good manners they expect to receive.

They are little blank pages which are waiting for us to write on, sadly we more often then not, fail to write the good stuff

I do agree that children are, for the most part, what we train them to be. But I'm not sure about the "exactly." Somehow, try as you may, the children will still have their idiosyncrasies. And I wonder if the sentence at the end, about the little blank pages waiting for us to write on, is suggestive of John Locke's "blank slate." I feel children do have a character to begin with, except that it is at its most malleable when they are very young.

The question is, are the children "animals"? I wonder if the survey sorted out the responses according to age. That is to say, what age group did the ones who thought children are animals fall into; and what ages were those who didn't think so. I ask this because it may turn out that people who are old enough so that there is a wider generation gap between them and the children, are the ones who hold the negative view of the children.

The younger adults, young enough to have grown up in pretty much the same conditions as the children are growing up in, may not have this attitude. Of course, it may be argued that they don't think the children are animals because they themselves are animals. However, all this is hypothetical, since we don't know if there is this difference in views based on age differences.

To sum up, my own view of the children these days? Well, they are animals; but then all children in all ages have been animals. I suppose I was one too. It does seem, however, that as time goes by, children seem to have more power; more options; greater access to harmful things.

This reminds me of the saying that it is a good thing that infants don't have the physical strength to act out all their violent instincts. Well, the modern generation does actually have the power to give full rein to all its passions.

Or maybe I'm just getting old, and get frightened more easily.

Offline antonymous

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Re: Children
« Reply #8 on: 12 November, 2011, 08:28:03 PM »

I do agree that children are, for the most part, what we train them to be. But I'm not sure about the "exactly." Somehow, try as you may, the children will still have their idiosyncrasies. And I wonder if the sentence at the end, about the little blank pages waiting for us to write on, is suggestive of John Locke's "blank slate." I feel children do have a character to begin with, except that it is at its most malleable when they are very young.

The question is, are the children "animals"? I wonder if the survey sorted out the responses according to age. That is to say, what age group did the ones who thought children are animals fall into; and what ages were those who didn't think so. I ask this because it may turn out that people who are old enough so that there is a wider generation gap between them and the children, are the ones who hold the negative view of the children.

The younger adults, young enough to have grown up in pretty much the same conditions as the children are growing up in, may not have this attitude. Of course, it may be argued that they don't think the children are animals because they themselves are animals. However, all this is hypothetical, since we don't know if there is this difference in views based on age differences.
To sum up, my own view of the children these days? Well, they are animals; but then all children in all ages have been animals. I suppose I was one too. It does seem, however, that as time goes by, children seem to have more power; more options; greater access to harmful things.

This reminds me of the saying that it is a good thing that infants don't have the physical strength to act out all their violent instincts. Well, the modern generation does actually have the power to give full rein to all its passions.

Or maybe I'm just getting old, and get frightened more easily.

A very good point well made.
I would imagine that anyone who grew up in the thirties and forties and possibly early fifties are most likely to hold the negative view. I did and am appalled at the lack of discipline exercised by the parents of todays kids!
“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. Sometimes it'svice versa"

Offline DoubleQ

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Re: Children
« Reply #9 on: 21 November, 2011, 03:12:45 AM »
It all comes down to nurture not nature.

There are some specifics that make some (including me) think that children these days are not like children of my generation.

1. Teaching methods - IMHO I don't think a teacher can teach without being infront of the class and all children paying attention. Teachers have become childminders and children teach themselves. No wonder SOME can't spell, read or do simple maths. It's a travesty to see how some don't seem to be able to write or spell or know simple maths. Some of the agents that worked for me used to put it down to being dyslexic! What utter bull!!

2. Children are encouraged to call everyone by their first name. I'm in my 50s and if I see our old next door neighbour I still call her Mrs. Kidd I wouldn't dream of calling her by her first name. When I started working everyone I worked with called each other Mr, Mrs, or Miss and the only time first names were used was in the staff room. I think this instills a feeling of respect for your elders.

3. We live in a society where everyone wants the latest thing, be it phones, tv or other items. When we got married  30+ years ago we were more than happy to have second hand anything. They are more than happy to go into debt for everything they 'need'. The only I've had is a mortgage and I'm very proud of that.

4. Teenagers starting work expect to be able to have their mobile phone on, be able to listen to music, have access to Facebook/twitter/Instant messenger when they are supposed to be working. Ask them to turn off the mobile or restrict access to websites and you're given a load of abuse.

We need to teach children to value what they have and if that's less than other people then that's ok.

I grew up on a council estate with Mum, 3 siblings, Nan and my mums 2 brothers all in the same house. My mum worked all her life to give us a good grounding in life. We many not have had the best of everything but we appreciated what we had and I wish now I could tell my mum what an exceptional job she did. It must have been bliddy hard to cope at times!

AND of course my sons are perfect... ;)

I strongly disagree with your first statement. I believe that children are far more instinctive than adults are, since they have not had society's mores taught to them. It is not natural to be sharing and kind and respectful of privacy and so on--those are society's strictures. On the other hand, I agree with you that the way children are taught these days creates the problems that face them today. We've all lost some degree of civility and self-respect, so it's not a shock that our children have as well.

I'm not from the UK, but I'm not overly fond of children--I've often said that if it doesn't do its business outside, in a litter box, or at the end of a leash, then I'm not interested in it.

Offline mommy0906

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Re: Children
« Reply #10 on: 01 February, 2012, 09:34:08 PM »
I have read the comments posted here and while I can understand them, I don't really agree. I have two children and they are polite and well behaved. I think that a lot of how they behave is a reflection of how they see others act around them. If you are violent and hostile, your children are MORE likely to behave in the same manner. If you are calm and treat others with respect, your children are MORE likely to act in the same manner. I think that while, what a parent teaches their child will HELP to shape them, they are still their own person. They form thoughts about what is acceptable behavior and they learn it from EVERYONE around them, not just their parents. I know that there are a lot of parents (people I know), who think that they only have to make certain that they watch out for the things that their children hear and see around them. Such is not the case. I always make certain to find out what my children see and hear when they are away from home. I think it is important because you never know what kinds of things they are learning when they are away from you. I love children and I think that if we take an active role in their lives, they are more likely to respond positively to that. I don't think that all children are wild, just the ones that need more attention.

Offline hdtg

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Re: Children
« Reply #11 on: 20 April, 2012, 02:02:03 PM »

I do agree that children are, for the most part, what we train them to be. But I'm not sure about the "exactly." Somehow, try as you may, the children will still have their idiosyncrasies. And I wonder if the sentence at the end, about the little blank pages waiting for us to write on, is suggestive of John Locke's "blank slate." I feel children do have a character to begin with, except that it is at its most malleable when they are very young.

The question is, are the children "animals"? I wonder if the survey sorted out the responses according to age. That is to say, what age group did the ones who thought children are animals fall into; and what ages were those who didn't think so. I ask this because it may turn out that people who are old enough so that there is a wider generation gap between them and the children, are the ones who hold the negative view of the children.

The younger adults, young enough to have grown up in pretty much the same conditions as the children are growing up in, may not have this attitude. Of course, it may be argued that they don't think the children are animals because they themselves are animals. However, all this is hypothetical, since we don't know if there is this difference in views based on age differences.
To sum up, my own view of the children these days? Well, they are animals; but then all children in all ages have been animals. I suppose I was one too. It does seem, however, that as time goes by, children seem to have more power; more options; greater access to harmful things.

This reminds me of the saying that it is a good thing that infants don't have the physical strength to act out all their violent instincts. Well, the modern generation does actually have the power to give full rein to all its passions.

Or maybe I'm just getting old, and get frightened more easily.

A very good point well made.
I would imagine that anyone who grew up in the thirties and forties and possibly early fifties are most likely to hold the negative view. I did and am appalled at the lack of discipline exercised by the parents of todays kids!


John Locke's blank slate theory is completely sensible, a child at birth can be nothing else, until the process of learning begins how can their be character? There can only be potential and a ceiling of individual potential.