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Author Topic: What rights do you have over your own image?  (Read 1096 times)

Offline Duffield1

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What rights do you have over your own image?
« on: 07 April, 2011, 03:48:07 PM »
If you were to attend an event, and a photographer was there snapping photos of people that walk by, do you have any right to ask them not to use your images? 

This was prompted by the latest outfits from Liverpool Day at the races, courtesy of the Daily Mail (although perhaps its fond renaming of Daily Whail might be more accurately Daily Whale today) - wouldn't you be mortified if you were included in this feature?
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1374468/The-good-bad-downright-tacky-It-Liverpool-Day-Aintree-kicks-off.html

OneFootInTheGame

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Re: What rights do you have over your own image?
« Reply #1 on: 27 May, 2011, 04:23:52 PM »
In the US, freedom of the press gives newspapers and the like certain leeway, but someone like a freelance photographer is supposed to have the subject sign a model release before using the picture. If they do not, and the subject of the photo doesn't like what he does with it, the subject can seek remedies in the courts. If you pose for a newspaper photographer, you're pretty much out of gas, but if it was taken without your knowledge, and tends to cast ridicule, even a news organization would be on shaky ground legally. If you're part of some news story, even if only standing in the crowd, you'd have no recourse.

If you're ever asked to sign a model release, read it carefully before doing so, because the standard release covers just about everything, including Photoshopping to a fare thee well. Releases signed by professional models are much more specific about what can, and cannot, be done with the image.

I'm not an attorney, but I did work as a photographer for a short spell in my youth.