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Author Topic: A ball of glass will bounce higher than a ball of rubber? Huh? Can that be right  (Read 3708 times)

Offline Hiheels

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  • Yes, yes, very nice. Now put it away.

Offline hdtg

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in theory its possible but this is not always a true statement. the basis for this is energy lost reforming shape so glass should bounce higher than rubber. but not all glass nor rubbers are the same. there are great varients in engery loss dependant on type and thats without variations of speed or surface or potential breakage.

Offline Hiheels

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Ah yes, the bit about energy loss in regaining shape makes sense.
I've never thought of glass as being particularly bouncy - it's something I'd like to try!

Offline seacommander

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The coefficient of elasticity will give you an idea of how bouncy different substances are. Although we think of rubber as being elastic and glass not or much less so, the reality is quite the reverse. Elasticity is the measure of the ability of a substance to regain its original shape following deformation - not 'stretchability' as we are accostomed to thinking. Glass is far more elastic than rubber because it is able to regain its shape after deformation far more quickly than rubber. If you were to compare steel, glass and rubber in this experiment the steel would bounce to a greater height than glass - and not run the risk of shattering. Rubber has a coeffcient of elasticity of about 0.01-0.1, glass 50-90, steel around 200 and diamond (one of your best friends?) 1050-1200!!
« Last Edit: 06 January, 2011, 06:09:10 PM by seacommander »

Offline Hiheels

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Interesting stuff!

..oh, and
8>< snip....and diamond (one of your best friends?) 1050-1200!!
...my only friend  :'(

Offline Blacksmith81

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Don't forget, glass is a hyper-viscous fluid, and not a rigid solid.

Wumpus

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Don't forget, glass is a hyper-viscous fluid, and not a rigid solid.

I thought that had been disproved?
All those olde worlde shop windows were installed with the thick part at the bottom by convention to look tidy, nothing whatsoever to do with the liquid glass sagging slowly.