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Author Topic: Why do the stripes on American ties go the opposite way to British stripey ties?  (Read 18031 times)

Online P-Kasso2

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Here's Mr Edgar Hoover with his bold American stripes going down from West to East.



And here is Mr Charles Windsdor with his very natty British stripes going down from East to West.

Why this traditional difference?


Offline AtMyWitzEnd

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There is a thread about this subject on the “Ask Andy About Clothes” Website forum
http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?78791-Tie-stripes

Aside from a lot of rubbish about the English slope leading the eye to the head while the American leads the eye down to the crotch, the reason given is that the English were very protective of their Regimental / School / Club tie patterns so the Americans reversed the stripes so not offend anyone or be accused of wearing something to which you are not entitled.

This is confirmed on the “A Suitable Wardrobe” Website. Will Boehlke wrote much the same in a Blogg a few years back.

“Since men began wearing neckties, the direction of the stripes on striped versions have traditionally gone from higher on the left to lower on the right, just as a man's coat buttons left over right. The direction is aesthetically pleasing, and complements a man's pocket square and boutonniere on the left side of the jacket.”

“Right hand high necktie stripings originated when Brooks Brothers brought the regimental tie to the States during the 1920's. BroBroClo deliberately reversed the direction of its stripes as a way of placating the English, some of whom might have been tiffed to find an American businessman wearing an old Eton necktie or suchlike without actually attending the school. Other American tie makers like the Robert Talbott Company did the same ... and the practice has continued in that country, whether the ties are regimental or not.”

http://asuitablewardrobe.dynend.com/2007/03/how-to-stripe-necktie.html

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There is a thread about this subject on the “Ask Andy About Clothes” Website forum
http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?78791-Tie-stripes

Aside from a lot of rubbish about the English slope leading the eye to the head while the American leads the eye down to the crotch, the reason given is that the English were very protective of their Regimental / School / Club tie patterns so the Americans reversed the stripes so not offend anyone or be accused of wearing something to which you are not entitled.

This is confirmed on the “A Suitable Wardrobe” Website. Will Boehlke wrote much the same in a Blogg a few years back.

“Since men began wearing neckties, the direction of the stripes on striped versions have traditionally gone from higher on the left to lower on the right, just as a man's coat buttons left over right. The direction is aesthetically pleasing, and complements a man's pocket square and boutonniere on the left side of the jacket.”

Right hand high necktie stripings originated when Brooks Brothers brought the regimental tie to the States during the 1920's. BroBroClo deliberately reversed the direction of its stripes as a way of placating the English, some of whom might have been tiffed to find an American businessman wearing an old Eton necktie or suchlike without actually attending the school.[/b] Other American tie makers like the Robert Talbott Company did the same ... and the practice has continued in that country, whether the ties are regimental or not.”

http://asuitablewardrobe.dynend.com/2007/03/how-to-stripe-necktie.html


That clears that up then. Thank  you Witz.

By the way, I think it was jolly decent of Brooks Brothers to consider the feelings of
old Etonians and our fighting forces, don't you?

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Well, that's my quota of "something new" to learn today.

Must be a special day - 10/10/10 might have something to do with it....

Offline AtMyWitzEnd

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Well, that's my quota of "something new" to learn today.
Me too .. I never realised that the stripes went a specific way

Offline RonaldTrump

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Well, that's my quota of "something new" to learn today.
Me too .. I never realised that the stripes went a specific way

And I DID realize that there were two directions of stripes, just as there are two ways of spelling the word "realize".  Of course, the American way is the correct way! :-) ;)