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Author Topic: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?  (Read 35279 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« on: 20 September, 2009, 10:23:28 PM »
I can't figure it out. Help!

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Wumpus

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #1 on: 20 September, 2009, 11:24:48 PM »
I'm a Northerner, I don't believe I've ever said anything of the sort in my life!

Offline imfeduptoo

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #2 on: 21 September, 2009, 03:23:31 PM »
It's same as the expression 'By gum' which is used in many other parts of the country - Ee bah gum is just A northern way of pronunciation of it.
It's a 'minced oath' meaning 'By God'.
A minced oath is something you use when you, for instance, drop a hammer on your foot and don't want to swear in front of the children or granny.

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #3 on: 21 September, 2009, 11:23:08 PM »
So it is just 'Eh by Gawd' then?

Same as in Sarf London?

Blimey! Smacker

(Just been wanting to use that smiley for ages).

Offline siasl

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #4 on: 01 June, 2010, 11:52:06 AM »
I was reminded of these gems:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Yorkshire man takes his cat to the vet.
Yorkshireman: "Ayup, lad, I need to talk to thee about me cat."
Vet: "Is it a tom ?"
Yorkshireman: "Nay, I've browt it wi'   us."

 ***

A Yorkshireman's dog dies and as it was a favourite pet he decides to have a gold statue made by a jeweller to remember the dog by.
Yorkshireman: "Can tha mek us a gold statue of yon dog?"
Jeweller: "Do you want it 18 carat?"
Yorkshireman: "No I want it chewin' a bone, yer daft begger!"

 ***

A Yorkshireman's wife dies and the widower decides that her headstone should have the words "She were Thine" engraved on it.
He calls the stone mason, who assures him that the headstone will be ready a few days after the funeral. True to his word the stone mason calls the widower to say that the headstone is ready and would he like to come and have a look.
When the widower gets there he takes one look at the stone to see that it's been engraved "She were Thin".

He explodes - good grief, man, you've left the flamin' "e" out!
The stone mason apologises and assures the poor widower that it will be rectified the following morning.

Next day comes and the widower returns to the stone mason - "There you go sir, I've put the "e" on the stone for you"..
The widower looks at the stone and then reads out aloud - "E, She were Thin".

***

Bloke from  Barnsley with a sore backside asks chemist "Nah then lad, does tha sell arse cream?"
Chemist replies "Aye, Magnum or Cornetto?"

ron

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #5 on: 22 December, 2011, 07:19:18 PM »
I have been told it derives from "Eboracum" ("E-bora-cum" turning into "ee by gum"), which was the Romans' name for York.

I am not sure, however, whether this is true, as I have found no authoritative confirmation of this.

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #6 on: 28 December, 2011, 08:35:38 PM »
It's a nice theory Ron but I am a bit sceptical...'ee bah gumming Yorkshiremen probably
hadn't even heard of Eboracum then any more they have today. I think Mrs Too's answer
feels like the right one so far.

Philip Robinson

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #7 on: 17 February, 2012, 07:12:26 PM »
No you are all wrong, its the name of a Lancastrian Temple were a special fighting art was perfected by the monks resident there. This came to be known as ee bah goom, ecky thump.

Bill Oddy was a master practitioner of the art.

Danny

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #8 on: 30 March, 2012, 08:37:03 AM »
" EE " is an exlamation of surprise / amazement / etc  /  and  " By Gum "  means " who would have thought that " / " Did it really " and more than likely " Bloody ell " .

phliptop

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #9 on: 04 March, 2013, 06:10:16 PM »
It goes back to the days of empire as I was told many years ago. The gum was an elixire or divinity that was supposed to make you bullet proof no doubt disproved by the British Army. And is of course an expression of comic amazement with the inference of disbelief.

Pockley

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #10 on: 28 May, 2014, 08:59:57 PM »
It is a combination.  There was an old expression derived from the Roman word for York, Eboracum.  In Yorkshire, up to the 1950s if not more recently, there was an attitude that anything special, or anyone with airs and graces, or anything especially unusual or impressive, must come from York.  Rarely did people think beyond York and few had been there more than once or twice.  This is the sense carried by the expression.  However, the pronunciation of phrase may then have been contorted to run with the more widely used By Gum, which is a 19th century expletive derived from By God.  The phrase is not, however, used as an expletive but more to express that something is impressive.

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #11 on: 30 May, 2014, 05:53:16 PM »
I called an ex-girlfriend who came from York and she was very classy...and brainy. And she's never heard of this 'origin' for ee bah gum' but that's not to say your explanation, Pockley, isn't the right one. I suppose it's just another of those mysterious things about English that are lost in the mists of time, somewhere oop Ilkley Moor no doubt.

Keith

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #12 on: 08 June, 2014, 02:43:25 PM »
It gets worse.

When I was a small boy in the early 60's and particularly naughty, my mum would give me a stern look and say, 'ee by gum the jumping moses!'
From experience I knew it meant I'd nearly crossed the line. At no other time did she use the term 'ee by gum.'...with 'jumping moses' or without.

I mentioned it to my Dad today and he hasn't got a clue what it means. Mum is no longer with us to ask.

Is the 'jumping moses' from the bible?
Does anybody know what means?

If it helps with the possible origin, I was raised in Manchester but, my mum's dad was raised in Halifax. He also used the term.

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #13 on: 08 June, 2014, 09:29:55 PM »
It
's getting mysteriouser and mysteriouser
...so I googled the oh so great wise one Google and tapped in 'jumping moses' and....not a bean.

Oh there was some faffy  fashion outfit called Jumpin' who are currently flogging snazzy striped escaped-prisoner-style zip-up onesies...

http://www.jumpinshop.com/en/jumpins.html?gclid=COLNh8KQ674CFSGWtAodBkQAGA

but I hardly think that was really what your mum had in mind, do you?

Or there's loads of guff about Bungy Jumping.

But, again, I doubt if your mum had that it mind either.

I think your mum just had a really great way with words. Between you you two've certainly added a very welcome new expression to my vocabulary! Thank you, Keith.

Jumping moses! Great!
« Last Edit: 08 June, 2014, 09:33:26 PM by P-Kasso2 »

Offline antonymous

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Re: Why do Northeners say 'ee by gum'? Does it mean anything?
« Reply #14 on: 08 June, 2014, 10:34:25 PM »
Jumping moses is probably a corruption of an old oath " jumping Jehosaphat" used as a euphemism for Jesus and Jehovah. The phrase is first recorded in the 1866 novel The Headless Horseman by Thomas Mayne Reid.[5] The longer version "By the shaking, jumping ghost of Jehosaphat" is seen in the 1865 novel Paul Peabody by Percy Bolingbroke St. John.[6]wiki

Jumping Jehoshaphat is a phrase that was used to remind people that when startling, unexpected, or troubling news come to you, you will remember to “jump” into GOD'S arms and allow HIM to take care of your problem. Just like  Jehoshaphat the king of Judah did when faced with a much stronger army and seemingly hopeless odds.

This phrase is probably linked to several others -eg  'Holy Moses!' and 'Holy Smoke!'
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