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Author Topic: At what temperature do humans die of exposure?  (Read 857 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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At what temperature do humans die of exposure?
« on: 04 December, 2017, 03:18:05 PM »

Come to that, why do we die instead of going into deep-freeze, able to be defrosted and resuscitated?
« Last Edit: 04 December, 2017, 05:11:17 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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Offline Duffield1

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Re: At what temperature do humans die of exposure?
« Reply #1 on: 05 December, 2017, 12:52:24 PM »
There's a couple of different ways to think of this - as your temperature drops, so your heart rate falls, but equally, you are 'refrigerated' so you last longer.  This is why they sometimes cool the brain of patients during operations, as this slows the rate at which your brain becomes incapable of returning to normal usage.

When the body's core temperature falls below 95 degrees farenheit, your organs struggle to work properly, and that's when hypothermia kicks in.  Keep your body at that temperature, and you'll die.

For deep freeze, you'd need to cool the body sufficiently quickly that you go through the hypothermic stage into 'frozen' to preserve the body - but the formation of ice crystals in your cells means that the cell walls are ruptured causing irreparable damage.  That's why you can't currently be frozen solid and then resurrected.  Unless you have the healing powers and cell strength resilience of Captain America.

Don't forget that you'd need to be defrosted as quickly as you were frozen to avoid serious harm coming back out the other side.

Offline Duffield1

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Re: At what temperature do humans die of exposure?
« Reply #2 on: 05 December, 2017, 12:53:45 PM »
Just to add, here's a fascinating article on the subject:
http://www.medicaldaily.com/breaking-point-how-cold-can-live-human-body-get-357418

The idea that you get a hot flush when you are freezing to death is quite terrifying.

Offline P-Kasso2

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Re: At what temperature do humans die of exposure?
« Reply #3 on: 06 December, 2017, 12:27:18 PM »
Just to add, here's a fascinating article on the subject:
http://www.medicaldaily.com/breaking-point-how-cold-can-live-human-body-get-357418

The idea that you get a hot flush when you are freezing to death is quite terrifying.

Actually, Norwegians warned me of this sudden feeling of increased warmth or 'hot flush' years ago, as one of the biggest perils of falling over drunk on the way home from a party in winter in Norway.  It makes you feel deliciously cosy when you are actually freezing to death and ought to get out of there as soon as poss rather than lying in a snow drift luxuriating in it.

I was slightly surprised that 95 degrees seems to be the lowest temp our bodies can go to before death sets in. I'd have thought it might be a lot lower but I bow to your sources. I don't know why I thought it'd be lower, I just did. Now I know better.
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