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Author Topic: It's rare to get struck by lightning, and survive...but has anybody ever been st  (Read 524 times)

Offline P-Kasso2

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...struck by a Meteor?  And survived?   I was idly chatting about this with two friends in the safety of the pub today. One friend said that the odds were humungously long against being zapped by a meteor and surviving a direct meteor strike was 100% impossible - because you'd be instantly vaporised.

The other friend said that he thought it probably all depended on the size of the meteor and whether you were wearing gumboots at the time.

As for me, I'm piggy in the middle. All I can say is that I have never ever once read anything about any unlucky oiks getting struck by a meteor. Not even by a small meteor. So I can't say either way.

Maybe it's best I just repeat the question and hope that someone on IA has the answer...

Has anybody ever been struck  by a meteor?  And survived?
"I live in hope"

Offline Duffield1

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I would imagine that the meteor is traveling at terminal velocity (200 to 400 mph according to  https://www.amsmeteors.org/fireballs/faqf/), and would - as most are - still be incredibly hot.  This is much slower than a bullet (1,700 mph), but still plenty for a heavy ball of rock to cause quite some damage, especially as it would usually be of a reasonably substantial size to have survived entry through the atmosphere.

You only have to look at the crater that meteors leave to see that this is quite some force, but to say you'd be instantly vapourised is perhaps pushing it a little far.  Of course, this will depend on size - a 10 tonne meteor (which would potentially retain an awful lot more of its entry speed, far surpassing 'normal' terminal velocity) would be significantly more damaging than a large pebble.

There is only thought to be one person who has been struck by a meteor, and she survived.  Read her story here:
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/02/130220-russia-meteorite-ann-hodges-science-space-hit/

Offline P-Kasso2

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I would imagine that the meteor is traveling at terminal velocity (200 to 400 mph according to  https://www.amsmeteors.org/fireballs/faqf/), and would - as most are - still be incredibly hot.  This is much slower than a bullet (1,700 mph), but still plenty for a heavy ball of rock to cause quite some damage, especially as it would usually be of a reasonably substantial size to have survived entry through the atmosphere.

You only have to look at the crater that meteors leave to see that this is quite some force, but to say you'd be instantly vaporised is perhaps pushing it a little far.  Of course, this will depend on size - a 10 tonne meteor (which would potentially retain an awful lot more of its entry speed, far surpassing 'normal' terminal velocity) would be significantly more damaging than a large pebble.

There is only thought to be one person who has been struck by a meteor, and she survived.  Read her story here:
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/02/130220-russia-meteorite-ann-hodges-science-space-hit/

What a painfully sad tale your link tells! Poor old Ann Hodges! And, while being the only person ever to have survived been hit by a meteor is unique, her vast bruising tells me that it isn't something I'd like to endure not even for 15  minutes of fame.

Worse still is the fact that she even got sued for it! Americans do seem to sue at a drop of a hat let don't they? I am more than slightly glad I do not live in the States anymore.

Thank you, Duff, for your answer. It solves the minor meteor dispute in our local pub - for which I thank you greatly and am pleased to award you a Good Post thingy. Wear it with pride!

Gd_pst.
« Last Edit: 08 November, 2017, 11:45:26 AM by P-Kasso2 »
"I live in hope"