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Author Topic: Which fishes taste sweet? Which is the sweetest tasting? Is there an increased  (Read 1039 times)

Offline Cosmos

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calorific value with the sweetness?
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Offline P-Kasso2

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I think the 'sweetest' fish is always going to be the freshest fish.  Obviously, if pushed, I'd rate the taste of a fresh cod 'sweeter' than a juicy fresh mackerel - but then I'd also say that mackerel has its own very special taste which is why I catch it and why I buy it.

As for the second part of your question, Cosmos (does the sweetness of a fish have any calorific value?) I'll have to leave that to others on IA better placed than me to answer that.

Personally I doubt if sweetness has any effect on calorific content - except that the sweeter the fish the more likely I am to have treble helpings.
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Offline jacquesdor

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I was treated to a taste of cray fish straight from the river recently. It was prepared, washed and so on, right on my patio. Then cooked in my kitchen for only about four minutes. The sliver of flesh from the claw was the sweetest and most tender fish I have ever tasted.It took a long time to get a small amount of meat, but the melt in the mouth taste was worth it! The sweetness doesn't come from sugar, so calory content is likely to  be minimal.

Offline P-Kasso2

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I agree with you 100% Jacques. Especially about crayfish when it's eaten the way the Swedish eat it...
and that's on a beach with a glass or four of schnapps and increasingly silly drinking songs as the Swedes do every Midsummer's Eve! 

Moving West a bit, I caught, cooked, and ate a nålfisk (aka a needle fish) when I lived in Norway. Mine was about 2 feet long and was the sweetest and most delicate fish I'd ever tasted - but that was probably because it was only about 20 minutes from the fjord to the frying pan. Luxury or what?

Apart from being sweet and succulent the nålfisk has another really big advantage. It has green bones! I kid you not. Bright green bones. That makes it dead easy when scoffing needle fish because you can easily see the green bones against the white meat....so there's no choking to death or having to wheeze "Kvikk! Kvikk!... Vat's the Norsky for 'Heimlich Manoeuvre'?"


A nålfisk or needle fish. Click to enlarge. Then simply gut and descale it.
Fillet it and roll the fillets in seasoned flour or oatmeal. Then pan fry the fillets until golden.
Sweet as a nut and far fewer calories than a bucketful of deep fried Mars bars.

« Last Edit: 07 October, 2016, 04:58:40 PM by P-Kasso2 »
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