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Topic Summary

Posted by: P-Kasso2
« on: 15 April, 2017, 12:09:13 AM »

The building to the back of our house has just installed security lighting on its car park that shines directly into three rooms in my house - to such a degree that it is uncomfortable sitting on one side of our dining table.  It won't affect sleep, as we have lined curtains, but it does feel intrusive.

I can't find any examples of when lighting has been found to be unreasonably intrusive - can anyone help define the threshold?

From what I understand, 'light nuisance' is as illegal as causing 'noise nuisance' is illegal. Your local council are legally bound to investigate any complaint from a householder unable to enjoy their house because of environmental nuisance makers. You can't sue against intrusive street lighting, but Light coming from a premises can invoke the law.

Surprisingly, the CPRE (the Campaign for Rural England, who I thoroughly support) have an interesting take on light polluters and what to do about them and how to go about it.

Read their website below Duff and I think you'll get a clear and very useful step by step 'How To' combat the cause of the light pollution that you are experiencing....I'd quote it here for you but it's a pdf...

https://www.cpre.org.uk/resources/countryside/dark-skies/item/download/3420



Posted by: Duffield1
« on: 13 April, 2017, 06:22:41 PM »

The building to the back of our house has just installed security lighting on its car park that shines directly into three rooms in my house - to such a degree that it is uncomfortable sitting on one side of our dining table.  It won't affect sleep, as we have lined curtains, but it does feel intrusive.

I can't find any examples of when lighting has been found to be unreasonably intrusive - can anyone help define the threshold?