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Recent Posts

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21
Consumer affairs / Re: Has Britain ever issued a £2 note?
« Last post by P-Kasso2 on 12 July, 2019, 06:08:29 PM »
Oh Yes there was!!
According to Wiki: In 1793, during the war with revolutionary France, the Bank issued the first £5 note. Four years later, £1 and £2 notes appeared, although not on a permanent basis.

Cheers Tec!  So!  My friend was dead right.  And I was dead wrong!  Wouldn't be the first time.

PS  I was absolutely convinced I tell you that the Bank of E had never issued a £2 note.  Not once. Not ever.  In fact I was definitely decidedly convinced that £2 notes were just musical hall jokes. 
Just shows you how wrong P-Kasso can be.  Watch this space and I'll no doubt show you how much wronger I can be when I really try!
22
I thought this might be an easy one but it's far from it.
Some sites indicate that there was a Royal Exchange in 1571 but most brokers were not allowed due to their manners! So they traded in Coffee Houses.
The first regulated exchange began in 1801. (from Wiki)

According to https://bebusinessed.com/history/history-of-the-stock-market/
Shares weren't traded until 1825. London became the main market for Europe.

Can't find anything to establish what the first stocks were though.

Thank you for all the digging, Tec!  And, from reading through the excellent web-link you gave, it looks like I'll just have to sit back and be satisfied with this quote (nicked from your bebusinessed.com link) to at least partly answer my question...

"In 1602, the Dutch East India Company officially became the world’s first publicly traded company when it released shares of the company on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange. Stocks and bonds were issued to investors and each investor was entitled to a fixed percentage of East India Company’s profits."


PS  If anyone finds any more on the early days of the London Stock Exchange and specifically its first-ever traded stocks, this is the post to post it on - and I'll be very grateful if you do!
23
Consumer affairs / Re: Has Britain ever issued a £2 note?
« Last post by tecspec on 10 July, 2019, 11:38:35 AM »
Oh Yes there was!!
According to Wiki: In 1793, during the war with revolutionary France, the Bank issued the first £5 note. Four years later, £1 and £2 notes appeared, although not on a permanent basis.
24
I thought this might be an easy one but it's far from it.
Some sites indicate that there was a Royal Exchange in 1571 but most brokers were not allowed due to their manners! So they traded in Coffee Houses.
The first regulated exchange began in 1801. (from Wiki)

According to https://bebusinessed.com/history/history-of-the-stock-market/
Shares weren't traded until 1825. London became the main market for Europe.

Can't find anything to establish what the first stocks were though.
25
There's a whole host of them here:
https://lifeintheuktestweb.co.uk/british-citizenship-test-6/

Sadly, what is missing is questions like:
"If a close relative passes away and you are in a public place do you:
a. let all your emotion out
b. fight back the tears and run to a quiet place
c. respond "I see.  I think I might need a cup of tea." and then internalise any pain and/or grief.
26
It could well be true - wombats are part of the koala family, and they definitely poop in cubes!  The explanation is thought to be linked to the length it takes them to digest food - 14-18 days - which extracts all the water.  The hard stools form their shape in the ridged upper intestine, and then are not malformed on their way out.

http://theconversation.com/why-do-wombats-do-cube-shaped-poo-55975
27
I know that Aussie's are world famous for their irreverent sense of humour but... this just about takes the biscuit!

I know Australia is renowned for its unique and zany wildlife, but but but...Square poo?  Oh, c'mon!

However, he was adamant that Koalas excrete square poo.  So I ended up pulling out my big guns and threatened him with asking IA members what is true and what ain't, and then we'd soon see who is right and who is just an upside down joker.

So, what do you reckon?

Do koala bears have square poo?   Or is he talking crap?

28
.
....what questions will they have to answer when applying for British status? 

Are there any examples of those tests freely available on the net? 

And what are these questions like?   Are they really difficult questions?   Or are they bone-simple Q's that even the thickest non-British alien could easily answer with one eye tied behind their back?

I ask because (as a  born-in-Britain, dyed-in-the-wool Englishman) I just want to see whether I'd pass the test with flying colours - or fail miserably and be deported forthwith.
29
Are there still as many 'reservations' as there were?  Or have they gradually been phased out?  I'd love to know.

I figure this question of mine must be too difficult for the massed bonces of IA members.  After all, it had lurked unanswered for a couple of months.  So I set out to find the answer myself.  And it wasn't difficult.  In fact it was child's play to answer.

Just a quick google.  First I googled a question of mine that had lain unanswered in a dusty corner of IA for even longer. Then a very short scroll down Wiki's answer.  And there it was in black and white....

So, what did I finf?  How many reservations are there for ‘Red Indians’ still in America?

"Each of the 326 Indian reservations in the United States is associated with a particular Native American nation. Not all of the country's 567 recognized tribes have a reservation—some tribes have more than one reservation, while some share reservations.

And these cover "56,200,000 acres (22,700,000 hectares) or 87,800 sq miles (227,000 square kilometres)"
which as we all know is approximately the size of Idaho.

That answer is a bit surprising with 326 reservations, shared among 567 tribes - It's an interesting Wiki page, and one with more related info than you can shake a Mensa badge at.  I'd say it's well worth a butcher's.
30
What were the original stocks and shares on the London Stock Market when it first opened?

Just wondering.
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