Intelligent Answers

Intelligent Answers => Intelligent Questions... and Intelligent Answers => Food and drink => Topic started by: P-Kasso2 on 18 July, 2017, 05:15:59 PM

Title: I'm not sure if this Q really belongs under Science and Nature...but here goes..
Post by: P-Kasso2 on 18 July, 2017, 05:15:59 PM

Every time I crack an egg I seem to get niggly bits of eggshell floating in it. It pees me off.

In fact, it's not ending up with bits of eggshell in it that's annoying...It is trying to get the bliddy  bits out that really gruntles me most.

If I try wangling the bits out with a well-aimed dry finger it just makes the bits skitter away like mad. It's infuriating!

But now, sheer bliss and eureka moment! I have just discovered that using a wet finger works like magic. Every single time!

Dry finger = bad. But wet finger = good. Why is that? And what's the science behind it?
Title: Re: I'm not sure if this Q really belongs under Science and Nature...but here goes..
Post by: Cosmos on 18 July, 2017, 10:51:26 PM
Break the egg on a flat surface (instead of a pan etc edge) and there won't be any bits .
Title: Re: I'm not sure if this Q really belongs under Science and Nature...but here goes..
Post by: tecspec on 19 July, 2017, 03:50:15 PM
or use the half egg shell. It's like a magnet!!
Title: Re: I'm not sure if this Q really belongs under Science and Nature...but here goes..
Post by: P-Kasso2 on 20 July, 2017, 08:37:49 AM
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Thanks Tec and Cos...First off, ta for the terrific tip Tec. It works like magic! I just tried using the empty half shell like a scoop and really does 'suck in' the shell shrapnel like a magnet. It is really weird.
And Cos...I tried your tip too of bashing the egg on a flat surface but either I need practice and am very cack-handed or I'll just have to get used to scrambled egg for breakfast. It made a complete mess! I got just as many bits in the frying pan AND I had to wash down the kitchen work surface.
So I think that for the time being I'll stick to my old way of cracking the egg with a really sharp cook's knife - one quick rap - because that way I get a nice clean cut...it's only when I lever the cracked egg open that I get problems with floating bits of shell breaking off. And that's exactly when Tec's tip is so valuable. It's now my preferred way of getting all the eggshell debris out of my frying pan.
Thanks again to you both but here's one very last eggy question...
How come using the dry eggshell half as a scoop attracts shell bits whereas using my equally dry fingertip sends the shell shrapnel skittering away like mad? Could it have anything to do with Einstein's theory of relativity as it relates to fried eggs?

Title: Re: I'm not sure if this Q really belongs under Science and Nature...but here goes..
Post by: Cosmos on 20 July, 2017, 10:34:27 PM
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Thanks again to you both but here's one very last eggy question...
How come using the dry eggshell half as a scoop attracts shell bits whereas using my equally dry fingertip sends the shell shrapnel skittering away like mad? Could it have anything to do with Einstein's theory of relativity as it relates to fried eggs?

I believe it's because of static electricity . The action of the egg rubbing against any surface (taking it out of the carton for example) will cause a build up of static . You could try using a dry finger rubbed against a towel etc but in most people static dissipates quickly . Here's a general explanation of static from Scientific American . https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bring-science-home-static-electricity-attraction/
Title: Re: I'm not sure if this Q really belongs under Science and Nature...but here goes..
Post by: P-Kasso2 on 21 July, 2017, 10:13:06 AM


I believe it's because of static electricity . The action of the egg rubbing against any surface (taking it out of the carton for example) will cause a build up of static . You could try using a dry finger rubbed against a towel etc but in most people static dissipates quickly . Here's a general explanation of static from Scientific American . https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bring-science-home-static-electricity-attraction/

Just had  poached eggs on toast Cosmos - made for me by the three Michelin starred Mrs P-Kasso - so I wasn't able to try out your static electricity experiment Cosmos. But I will.
It sounds like between you and the Scientific American you have answered my question remarkably well. Many thanks.

I leave you Cosmos with this amazing tip for poaching the perfect poached egg...When you boil the water, turn down to the heat until it is just a lazy simmer...only when the water has calmed down should you swirl it and drop the egg in.

This is because too rapid boiling causes turbulence that naturally skews the swirling uncooked egg white all over the place...a calm rolling simmer keeps it neatly formed. Result? The perfect poached egg every time.

Seems like I have been doing it all wrong for years and getting frayed looking poached eggs full of bits of eggshell to boot. Breakfasts now will be the best meal of the day once again.