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Intelligent Answers => Intelligent Questions... and Intelligent Answers => Miscellaneous => Topic started by: P-Kasso2 on 16 August, 2010, 07:55:04 PM

Title: How is the London Evening Standard doing since it became a free sheet?
Post by: P-Kasso2 on 16 August, 2010, 07:55:04 PM
.
I was amazed when I was devastating Brick Lane and all points East on my last
state visit to London last week that the Evening Standard no longer costs 30p.

It no longer costs anything!

(http://pictures.directnews.co.uk/liveimages/Evening+Standard_1665_19055838_0_0_7024614_300.jpg)

It is given away free!

How long has this been going on?

And have the Evening Standard's circulation figures risen or plunged as a result since
it became a free sheet?
Title: Re: How is the London Evening Standard doing since it became a free sheet?
Post by: AtMyWitzEnd on 17 August, 2010, 01:07:53 AM
Londonís Evening Standard became a freesheet on 12 October 2009. The circulation has risen considerably since then ... 600,000 copies are now issued. Five years ago, the circulation of the Evening Standard was 450,000 copies a day, but this had declined to around 300,000 copies sold. (Although the circulation the month before it gave in and became free was only 116,192 copies a day). The paper is just considering increasing its print run to 750,000 copies.
The paper was acquired in January 2008 by Alexander Lebedev (famously for one penny owing to the 20 million debt). Up to October 2009, the paper lost £18m but managed to break even for the first time in June 2010.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2010/jun/21/freesheet-london-evening-standard-profit
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standard/article-23751782-a-bright-future-for-your-evening-standard.do