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Topic Summary

Posted by: wugu
« on: 18 July, 2017, 06:53:32 PM »

That appears to be things that actually appear on Facebook, but this was an e-mail sent to one of my little-used accounts with the message I pasted.
As I say, I'm assuming it's some sort of click bait phishing to see if the account is active, or just to advertise the site, but just wondered if anyone had had similar - or if indeed knew it was a legit case of someone looking for me.

Hi all. Fresh from the world of Cranium Deficient citizens.
I've had plenty of them. Why me, I haven't got the foggiest. But do agree that it's a ruse to get through traffic, logon details etc. They are legit though (no-one said ethical) & rated higher than 2 others as a 'reverse email lookup'. It is not unlikely that somebody does indeed use the service to glean personal data. My 'junk' email provider is fairly hard hit with 419 scams & I think this 'unSurelook' is just a means of knowing to whom they send & using a 1st name to personalise their scam. People use social media to scrape data from, then try confirming it through Email Sherlock. The reason my spam filter hooks them is good enough for me to ignore as my 1st principal in Emails is - don't click links! i.e. So what if someone searched you, they are unlikely to learn much that can effect them. The mail straight after is a 419 from Bank of America with the mega million offer in return for personal details (right? They want to give $ away to somebody who's name they don't know?), return address - a Gmail account (sic)!
Posted by: Hiheels
« on: 29 July, 2016, 10:28:40 PM »

I expect it'll be Johnny Depp looking for me seeing as his last relationship fell through...I do feel sorry for all these chaps who have to make do with various girlies as they haven't met me.
Posted by: siasl
« on: 29 July, 2016, 02:52:52 PM »

Rather strangely, EmailSherlock.com seems to be a legit thing, even with its own app on the Google App store (not to say it isn't riddled with bad stuff, but at least obvious things aren't there). It seem to have been born from an anti-spam idea - indexing what people now about the origins of spammers emails. I doubt it's hugely valuable, but it seems to have garnered an element of trust in various websites that rate other websites for trust/malware/spam/phishing.

So, seems legit, but I won't be testing it from any of my devices with any email addresses I control.
Posted by: Hiheels
« on: 29 July, 2016, 01:06:12 PM »

I did the hovery thing at the time and the links are definitely back to a site called E-mail Sherlock...but I still think it's a phishing type thing
Posted by: siasl
« on: 29 July, 2016, 10:43:09 AM »

I would say it's complete junk. Hover over the click-through to see the domain it's pointing to and you'll probably get more hints that it's a phish. DO NOT CLICK!

I've never seen one of these, but the whole correlation of other-user location, the phrase "searching for your email" and "finding your social media profile" smacks of unlikely/impossible combinations of information that a 3rd party engine/site could put together.

I'm sure the social media sites could put this together, but then the email sender would be clearly identified as them.
Posted by: Hiheels
« on: 29 July, 2016, 07:08:06 AM »

That appears to be things that actually appear on Facebook, but this was an e-mail sent to one of my little-used accounts with the message I pasted.
As I say, I'm assuming it's some sort of click bait phishing to see if the account is active, or just to advertise the site, but just wondered if anyone had had similar - or if indeed knew it was a legit case of someone looking for me.
Posted by: Cosmos
« on: 29 July, 2016, 12:19:17 AM »

I haven't received anything myself but it looks like it falls under the general description Facebook scam.
Searching hoax-slayer.com I found this http://www.hoax-slayer.com/facebook-related.shtml#tab1
Posted by: Hiheels
« on: 28 July, 2016, 07:04:29 PM »

Had this message on one of my e-mail accounts today
"Someone from United Kingdom searched your email and found your social media profile(s).

To see what they found out about you, click here.

Find Out What Information About You is Out There. Click here to Protect Your Identity."

Seems like phishing, or similar, to me - anyone got any gen?