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Topic Summary

Posted by: IncaBlue
« on: 20 November, 2016, 03:33:10 PM »

British shops and supermarkets do not store eggs in a fridge, the stores are quite cool and the eggs keep well in a cool environment. Once the eggs are taken home they are generally stored in the fridge or a cool place such as an unheated larder. Most homes/kitchens in Britain are much warmer than a shop hence the reason the eggs need to be stored in a cooler place.
Posted by: P-Kasso2
« on: 03 March, 2015, 06:04:53 PM »

I don't think they need it, but it would prolong their life, I guess, as it slows bacterial growth when it's cold.

Rules & regs - no idea, but there's the whole sink/swim method for determining freshness

I can never remember whether bad eggs sink or swim or the other way round so, just to be on the safe side, I use the tried and tested "crack the egg into an empty coffee mug and if it's green it's probably high time to use it" method.

Works every time.
Posted by: siasl
« on: 03 March, 2015, 01:44:18 PM »

I don't think they need it, but it would prolong their life, I guess, as it slows bacterial growth when it's cold.

Rules & regs - no idea, but there's the whole sink/swim method for determining freshness
Posted by: P-Kasso2
« on: 03 March, 2015, 12:42:20 PM »

If it's Ok for supermarkets, why does every domestic fridge have an egg tray in the door?

Do eggs need refrigerating or not?

What's the common sense rules and regs for keeping eggs?